Tags: Prostate Health | chronic pelvic pain sydnrome | prostatitis | difference

Know the Difference: Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome vs. Prostatitis

By    |   Monday, 14 Mar 2016 07:50 PM

Chronic pelvic pain syndrome is a class of prostatitis, however, CPPS lacks the most commonly assumed marker of prostatitis: infection. However, chronic pelvic pain syndrome is the most commonly diagnosed class of prostatitis.

According to Medscape, there are four types of prostatitis: acute bacterial, chronic bacterial, chronic abacterial, and asymptomatic inflammatory. Chronic pelvic pain syndrome is Type 3, the sort of prostatitis that is not caused by bacteria.

Chronic pelvic pain syndrome refers to unexplained pain in the groin or genitalia or corresponds with irritative voiding symptoms, according to Medscape. In order to be chronic pelvic pain, however, doctors cannot find evidence of pus cells or bacteria in a microscopic analysis of urine.

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Chronic bacterial prostatitis occurs when the prostate gland becomes inflamed by an infection in the urinary tract, Healthline reported. The prostate is a gland found beneath a man’s bladder.

The term chronic refers to a condition that continues to worsen at time goes on. Chronic pelvic pain syndrome and prostatitis do not have cures, Medscape noted.

Common symptoms include burning while going to the bathroom, having to use the restroom more frequently, and experiencing pain in the lower region of the back, according to Healthline.

CPPS is not triggered by an infection like Types 1 and 2 and may or may not cause an inflammation.

Some academics break Type 3 prostatitis, or chronic pelvic pain syndrome, into two parts. One consists of those with excessive numbers of white blood cells in prostatic secretions and the other is those that have normal levels of the cells. This distinction, however, has been controversial, Medscape noted.

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Chronic pelvic pain syndrome is a vague term for physicians who cannot find a disease that fits the patients’ experience. Mostly, however, effects of the syndrome last for some time, include pain in the prostate gland area, have no explanation for cause, and lack effective treatment, according to Medscape.

Possible causes for chronic prostatitis include a block of urine flow, microorganisms from sexually transmitted disease, the result of an autoimmune disease, uric acid present and leading to irritation, and dysfunction of muscles or the nervous system, Healthline reported.

Since the reason for which chronic abacterial prostatitis occurs is mostly unknown, treatment is made difficult. Most take medications to help with the symptoms. These include pain killers, muscle relaxers, and anti-anxiety drugs, Healthline added.

Chronic prosatitis can occur in men of all ages, the Urology Care Foundation said.

Those with similar symptoms but have bacteria found in tests probably have chronic bacterial prostatitis. In this case, germs cause infection, which leads to swelling of the prostate gland, Healthline stated. Doctors typically prescribe antibiotics to help fight the infection.

However, chronic pelvic pain syndrome, the least explicable of prostatitis types, accounted for 90 percent to 95 percent of cases, according to Medscape.

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Chronic pelvic pain syndrome is a class of prostatitis, however, CPPS lacks the most commonly assumed marker of prostatitis: infection. However, chronic pelvic pain syndrome is the most commonly diagnosed class of prostatitis.
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