Tags: Gun Control | apache trout | arizona | state | fish | facts

Apache Trout: 5 Facts About Arizona's Official State Fish

By    |   Monday, 04 Jan 2016 05:51 PM

Declared the state fish of Arizona in 1986, the Apache trout is currently close to extinction. However, it still persists, due greatly to conservation efforts the Arizona Fish and Game Department, which regulates fishing in Arizona.

Here are five facts about the Apache trout, the state fish of Arizona.

ALERT: Should Obama Have More Control Over Guns? Vote Now

1. It's native to Arizona
The Apache trout is one of two trout species that are native to Arizona. It is only found in the streams of forests on reservation land and the lakes of the White Mountains, which are located in the eastern part of Arizona (near the New Mexico border). The Arizona Fish and Game Department is actively increasing its stocking activity, hoping to recover and manage the species. Because of these efforts, the Apache trout has spread to lakes other than those of the White Mountains.

2. Hybridization is threatening the species' existence
The Apache trout is able to reproduce with the rainbow trout, which was introduced to Arizona in 1898, and the cutthroat trout. This hybridization ability has greatly reduced the population of pure Apache trout, and it is the primary reason why the Apache trout is considered to be critically endangered.

3. It's nearly extinct
In 1986, the Apache trout was marked as "vulnerable" by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN). It remained in this state for about 10 years; in 1996, it progressed to the "critically endangered" stage, the last stage before extinction from the wild. According to the IUCN, a critically endangered species faces an extremely high possibility of extinction in the near future.

VOTE NOW: Is Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey Doing a Good Job?

4. It has a distinct look
In a hatchery, an Apache trout can grow to more than 20 inches long and weigh up to 5 pounds; however, since the species mainly inhabits small streams, trout rarely surpass 9 inches in length. According to State Symbols USA, Apache trout have an olive-yellow body and yellow or golden bellies. They also have black spots speckling their bodies, and have black spots on either side of their pupils, giving the appearance of a black stripe through the eye.

5. Their habitat is shrinking
In the late 1800s, Apache trout were plentiful in the cold streams of the White Mountains of Arizona. The Arizona government began stocking nonnative trout species in its streams and lakes in the early 1900s, hoping to increase fishing opportunities. However, due to competition and inbreeding, the Apache trout's habitat decreased from 820 miles of streams to only 30 miles by the 1950s, says State Symbols USA. The White Mountain Apache Tribe started conservation efforts in 1955.

© 2017 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

   
1Like our page
2Share
FastFeatures
Declared the state fish of Arizona in 1986, the Apache trout is currently close to extinction. However, it still persists, due greatly to conservation efforts the Arizona Fish and Game Department, which regulates fishing in Arizona.
apache trout, arizona, state, fish, facts
452
2016-51-04
Monday, 04 Jan 2016 05:51 PM
Newsmax Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved