Tags: donald trump | locker room | sinatra | jfk | james bond

Trump's Attitude Learned From Sinatra, Bond, JFK

Trump's Attitude Learned From Sinatra, Bond, JFK

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump listens during the town hall debate at Washington University on October 9, 2016, in St Louis, Missouri. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

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Monday, 10 October 2016 11:49 AM Current | Bio | Archive

Teenager Donald Trump, who lived through the “baby boomer” slice of the demographic pie, was just as much influenced by role models of the 1950s as by the 1960s icons of sex, drugs ‘n rock and roll — maybe more so, as exemplified by The Donald’s private "locker room" banter, audio taped eleven years ago.

 

The young Trump likely looked to varying role models to imitate. Elvis perhaps, but surely Frank Sinatra and his Rat Pack, the really cool guys who drank to excess and chased women all night — and daytime too. Old Blue Eyes was a caricature of himself into old age, still performing, still drinking, still bantering and assuming all men cared about was sex.

 

Another example was James Bond, the fictional British espionage operative, who, though he did not sing, drank incessantly and of course chased women, or women chased him. White dinner jackets and martinis for 007’s seductions; button-up cardigans and Scotch for the crooner from Hoboken. KGB foes for Bond, real mafioso drifting in and out of the career of the Chairman of the Board.

 

The most well-known leitmotif of these role models was an attitude toward the female sex that carries a life sentence, or the chair, today. Sinatra’s image and Bond’s image were identified by chasing women, but back then, intercourse was never shown. And society didn’t mind the unveiling of the newest Bond Girl, or Sinatra’s latest squeeze. To the young Donald Trump, imitating the two heroes was natural and acceptable — including regular talk about sex, the more said the more status.

 

Trump just talked men-talk. Since all the king’s horses and all the king’s men in the MSM cannot find one incident of untoward sex acts in Trump’s past, a guy-to-guy conversation over a decade ago has to serve his enemies as a capital crime. That’s the story, not Trump’s words.

 

His comments are pardonable, however. JFK was the superstar sexual athlete who served as mentor for young Trump. Though he didn’t just pretend or merely talk about sexual exploits, he was the indisputable hero of all teenage boys. It was none other than John F. Kennedy, Democratic president of the United States, the epitome of male stardom: cold warrior, super patriot, handsome — and serial sex addict.

 

When it came to coverage of JFK, the king of philandering in that era, not even the chase was discussed. The media imposed its own gag order while JFK seduced young females right under their noses, almost anywhere, including the White House. And JFK allowed his friends in the mafia to supply girls, often using Frank Sinatra as pimp.

 

Trump’s comments about the opposite sex (assuming that term is still lawful), were not contemporary. They rise up out of his primordial adolescence after exposure to unsavory American culture.

Bernie Reeves founded five regional publications and the Raleigh Spy Conference. His writing has appeared in National Review and American Thinker. For more of his reports, Go Here Now.

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Teenager Donald Trump, who lived through the “baby boomer” slice of the demographic pie, was just as much influenced by role models of the 1950s as by the 1960s icons of sex, drugs ‘n rock and roll.
donald trump, locker room, sinatra, jfk, james bond
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2016-49-10
Monday, 10 October 2016 11:49 AM
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