Tags: womens march | antisemitism

Anti-Semitism of the Women's March Impossible to Ignore

Anti-Semitism of the Women's March Impossible to Ignore
Women's March Co-Chairwomen Linda Sarsour (L) and Tamika D. Mallory speak during the Women's March "Power to the Polls" voter registration tour launch at Sam Boyd Stadium on January 21, 2018, in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Ethan Miller/Getty Images)

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Friday, 18 January 2019 04:25 PM Current | Bio | Archive

Two years ago, as the nation prepared for the peaceful transfer of power from President Obama to President Trump, a protest movement was brewing. Launched via a social media dialog among women who had supported Hillary Clinton, it quickly became known as “The Women’s March.”

Though few of the marchers paid much attention to it, their actions gave rise to a national organization. Such inattention is no longer viable. With the third annual Women’s March set for this weekend, participation represents unequivocal support for the organization and its leadership. That leadership is steeped in Jew-hatred and bigotry.

How did we reach the point that millions of basically decent Americans seem perfectly happy to endorse and support such hatred? For its first two marches, it was easy to ignore the truth and pretend that the Women’s March is whatever each individual marcher wants it to be. Such ignorance — feigned or real — is no longer possible.

Back in 2017, a sizable demonstration in Washington, held the day after the inauguration, inspired parallel demonstrations around the country. It was far from clear, however, what the marchers hoped to achieve, or even what they were protesting. To most of the marchers, such details were irrelevant. They were simply upset that their candidate had lost the election, and were willing to grasp any opportunity to show their contempt for America’s new leader.

Marchers were adamant that they weren’t protesting the inauguration or the transfer of power, even though they quite obviously were. Instead, they insisted that they were merely “raising awareness” about “women’s issues.” When queried about what, specifically, they hoped to increase awareness of, however, no coherent answer was available.

The 2018 Women’s March was distinguishable from other anti-Trump protests only by the amount of pink in evidence. No one even bothered pretending that the marchers were trying to raise awareness about any actual issues, much less to make a specific point or accomplish anything concrete. The millions who marched in cities around the country made one point, and one point alone: they disliked the president. Without a march, who would have known?

All the while, however, the actual organization and its actual leaders were becoming real power brokers within the progressive movement and the Democratic Party. The Women’s March website prominently boasts the non-specific mission: creating transformative social change by providing intersectional education on a diverse range of issues through a commitment to dismantling systems of oppression and building inclusive structures guided by self-determination, dignity, and respect. If awards were given for meaningless doubletalk, this formula would win a lifetime achievement.

The website also includes a fairly lengthy statement of values and principles that combines jargon, standard leftist boilerplate, and bellicose support for positions that no one opposes. But it does, at least, provide some specificity about the organization’s concerns.

At the level of mission and values, then, the Women’s March is simply a women-led progressive organization. That makes it worthwhile to look at the women in leadership to understand who is driving it and why. The two most prominent leaders, Linda Sarsour and Tamika Mallory, have anti-Semitic bona fides beyond question.

Women broadly sympathetic to the organization’s mission and values, including Alyssa Milano and Meghan McCain, have called them out on their intolerable bigotry. Terry Shook, who launched the idea for the March via social media, has called for the current leadership to stand down. Tablet magazine took the lead in detailing the ways that Jew-hatred has permeated deeply into the organization’s functioning; other publications amplified the scope of the problem.

The anti-Semitic nature of the Women’s March organization and leadership has become far too obvious to ignore. The Democratic Party, currently walking an excruciating tightrope over the issue of anti-Semitism in its ranks announced its separation from the Women’s March, offering neither explanation nor criticism. Those who choose to join this weekend’s march no longer deserve the benefit of the doubt. It no longer matters what generic “women’s issue” they think they’re supporting, or even whether they embrace the organization’s entire statement of mission and values. They’re marching to promote the careers and the prominence of anti-Semites.

Bruce Abramson is the President of Informationism, Inc., Vice President and Director of Policy at the Iron Dome Alliance, and a Senior Fellow at the London Center for Policy Research. Jeff Ballabon is CEO of B2 Strategic, a Senior Fellow at the American Conservative Union's Center for Statesmanship and Diplomacy, and an advisor to Donald J. Trump for President, Inc. To read more of their reports — Click Here Now.

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Two years ago, as the nation prepared for the peaceful transfer of power from President Obama to President Trump, a protest movement was brewing.
womens march, antisemitism
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2019-25-18
Friday, 18 January 2019 04:25 PM
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