Tags: Cyber Security | Donald Trump | Net Neutrality | fcc | internet | pai | web

Net Neutrality Will Slow, Not Speed Up Internet Progress

Image: Net Neutrality Will Slow, Not Speed Up Internet Progress
Rob Thorp, of Backbone Campaign, demonstrates outside the FCC in Washington, D.C., Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015. Internet service providers would have to act in the "public interest" when providing a mobile connection to your home or phone, under new rules being considered by the FCC. The rule would ban Internet providers from "unjust or unreasonable" business practices. (Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP)

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Thursday, 18 May 2017 11:32 AM Current | Bio | Archive

The progressives in our government seemingly have never met a product or service that they haven’t attempted to regulate, tax, or otherwise stifle.

Over the past couple of years, conservatives have attempted to shine a light on what was another piece of bureaucratic edict prior to the enactment of these vaguely presented, new "fairness" regulations on the internet. Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, was particularly vocal during that time as well as in the past few weeks with his support for Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, for his "Restoring Internet Freedom Act," prohibiting the FCC from classifying Internet service providers as common carriers under Title II of the Communications Act, and "from imposing certain regulations on providers of such service."

According to Senator Lee’s website(lee.senate.gov), "[T]his engine of growth is threatened by the Federal Communications Commission’s 2015 Open Internet Order, which would put federal bureaucrats in charge of engineering the Internet’s infrastructure. That is why I am introducing the Restoring Internet Freedom Act, which would nullify Open Internet Order and prohibit the FCC from issuing a similar rule in the future."

The prevailing logic from many free market advocates is that antiquated new deal era regulations from a period of progressive and counterproductive government growth should not dictate the future of our most modern and innovative platforms.

It's unclear who had jurisdiction over the Web when former Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Tom Wheeler set Title II classification to regulate the Internet as a utility. Previously the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) was the main enforcement bureaucracy.

Michi Iljazi, vice president of the Taxpayers Protection Alliance told me for this blog, "What ex-Chairman Tom Wheeler did with his Title II classification of the [I]nternet as a utility was damaging on a number of levels. He increased regulations to the point of hindering investment and competition in the broadband marketplace. He also unilaterally usurped the jurisdictional authority of another federal agency."

Congress has two reasonable options here. They can consider creating compromise legislation protecting the principles and stated intention of Net Neutrality — with a very light regulatory touch. Legislation not creating barriers to entry for new companies; one allowing for competition while still protecting consumers. That would alarm some who would rather see the government's control rolled back to the pre-Net Neutrality era.

One thing that is known for sure, the broadband investment in infrastructure has slowed down by 5.6 billion. This was caused by barriers created by the law limiting smaller companies from entering the marketplace.

The Wireless Internet Service Providers Association has long opposed Net Neutrality. They claimed that they would be saddled with legal costs so high that it would prevent them from upgrading equipment that provides Internet service to small towns and rural areas.

Ajit Pai, the current FCC Chairman who was just appointed for a five year team by President Trump, highlighted the groups concerns when wrote in 2015. "KWISP Internet serves 475 customers in rural northern Illinois. As a result of the regulatory uncertainty and costs created by the FCC’s decision, KWISP plans to delay network upgrades that would have upgraded customers from 3Mbps to 20Mbps service, new tower construction that would have brought service to unserved areas, and capacity upgrades that would reduce congestion for existing customers — not to mention the jobs needed to make all of that happen. KWISP worries that even a frivolous lawsuit brought under the Order could force ownership to 'close the business.'"

This seems to be another case of overregulation crushing small innovators and job seekers in America.

Julio Rivera is an entrepreneur, small business consultant and political activist. He contributes to RightWingNews.com and NewsNinja2012.com, and had previously covered boxing and baseball for the now defunct "The Urban News" in his native Paterson, N.J. For more of his reports, Go Here Now.

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JulioRivera
The progressives in our government seemingly have never met a product or service that they haven’t attempted to regulate, tax, or otherwise stifle. Net Neutrality seems to be another case of overregulation crushing small innovators and job seekers in America.
fcc, internet, pai, web
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2017-32-18
Thursday, 18 May 2017 11:32 AM
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