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Tags: reusable water bottles | bacteria | toilet | pet bowl | kitchen sink | swab

Reusable Water Bottles Germier Than a Toilet Seat

woman holding open reusable water bottle
(Dreamstime)

By    |   Thursday, 22 February 2024 03:58 PM EST

A new study reveals that reusable water bottles are teeming with horrifying levels of bacterial contamination. The bottles harbored more germs than a toilet seat, pet bowl, and even the notoriously dirty kitchen sink, known as one of the germiest places in a home.

In fact, the researchers with Waterfilterguru.com concluded that on average, reusable water bottles had 40,000 times the bacteria of a toilet seat, 14 times the bacteria of a pet bowl, and twice the bacteria in a kitchen sink.

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According to Study Finds, swab tests determined that the average reusable water bottle contains 20.8 million colony-forming units (CFUs) of bacteria. The two main types of bacteria were identified as gram-negative rods, which are commonly associated with hospital-acquired infections and bacillus, which could lead to uncomfortable gastrointestinal issues.

Spout-top and screw-top lids contained the most bacteria of all the water bottles, with 30 million CFUs each. A squeeze-top bottle, deemed the cleanest, had 3 million CFUs, or 6,000 times the bacteria of a toilet seat.

Researchers also delved into how people clean their water bottles. While most folks said they washed their water bottles daily, 13% said they only washed them a few times a month. The researchers emphasized how important it is to wash and sanitize water bottles, especially when users may be ill, or the bottles are used for drinks other than water.

To keep reusable water bottles sanitized, experts recommend the following techniques. To properly clean a reusable water bottle, remove all existing liquid. Mix lukewarm water with a mild dish soap and pour it into the bottle. This helps destroy microbes because dish soap contains surfactants that trap dirt and remove it from the surface of the bottle. Don’t use cold water because it hinders the soap from dissolving and doing its job. You can also use distilled white vinegar or baking soda to clean water bottles. Use a small, bristled cleaning brush instead of a sponge to get into all the nooks and crannies.

Once you’ve cleaned the bottle with whatever product you selected, rinse it out and allow it to dry.

Avoid drinking out of your water bottle while eating, say experts, who reveal that the bacteria from your mouth can transfer into the water and multiply.

© 2024 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved.


Health-News
A new study reveals that reusable water bottles are teeming with horrifying levels of bacterial contamination. The bottles harbored more germs than a toilet seat, pet bowl, and even the notoriously dirty kitchen sink, known as one of the germiest places in a home. In...
reusable water bottles, bacteria, toilet, pet bowl, kitchen sink, swab
386
2024-58-22
Thursday, 22 February 2024 03:58 PM
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