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Dr. Mike Roizen
Dr. Mike Roizen is chief medical officer at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute, an award-winning author, and has been the doctor to eight Nobel Prize winners and more than 100 Fortune 500 CEOs.

Dr. Mike Roizen

Tags: inflammation | cancer | diabetes | dr. roizen

Fruits That Help Fight Inflammation

Michael Roizen, M.D. By Monday, 27 June 2022 01:21 PM EDT Current | Bio | Archive

An astounding 897,000 results come up on Google when you search for "fruit flambé" (fresh fruit ignited with alcohol). That's kind of ironic, because the truth is that uncharred fresh fruit tamps down fires related to inflammation in your body.

Inflammation can be a good response if short-lived; it helps your immune system to heal a wound or fight an infection.

But when it becomes chronic because of the presence of visceral belly fat, it increases your risk for cardiovascular disease, cancer, arthritis, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and autoimmune and neurodegenerative disorders. And those conditions fuel more inflammation.

Fortunately, the fruits you eat can go a long way toward preventing chronic inflammation:

• Berries are loaded with bioactive compounds that help block inflammation. According to Harvard University, it's the compounds that make them so colorful — anthocyanins and ellagic acid — that give berries the power to lower the risk of Alzheimer's, heart disease, and diabetes. Their experts say to eat one and a half to two cups of various berries daily to fight chronic inflammation.

• Apples and pears can take a bite out of inflammation too. According to a meta-review of studies published in the journal Current Developments in Nutrition, apple or pear intake significantly decreased risk of cerebrovascular disease, Type 2 diabetes, and all-cause mortality.

• Stone fruits such as cherries, peaches, apricots, and plums are also loaded with colorful phytochemicals and anthocyanins that tamp down inflammation.

© King Features Syndicate


DrRoizen
Inflammation can be a good response if short-lived; it helps your immune system to heal a wound or fight an infection. But when it becomes chronic, it increases your risk for disease.
inflammation, cancer, diabetes, dr. roizen
242
2022-21-27
Monday, 27 June 2022 01:21 PM
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