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Dr. Mike Roizen
Dr. Mike Roizen is chief medical officer at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute, an award-winning author, and has been the doctor to eight Nobel Prize winners and more than 100 Fortune 500 CEOs.

Dr. Mike Roizen

Tags: alzheimers smell | obesity | dr. roizen

Loss of Smell Can Signal Alzheimer's Risk

Michael Roizen, M.D. By Thursday, 06 October 2022 11:51 AM EDT Current | Bio | Archive

Recent research shows that the African elephant has the strongest sense of smell in the animal kingdom; they can smell water sources 12 miles away. If they lost that ability, they'd be hard-pressed to get their needed 50 gallon-a-day supply of water.

If you lose your sense of smell — especially if it happens rapidly — you may be losing another valuable asset: your cognitive powers.

A study in the journal Neurology Advisor reveals that if you aren't having any cognition problems but your ability to smell is fading fast, it’s a strong predictor your brain is undergoing changes that are features of Alzheimer's disease, such as a smaller volume of grey matter in areas associated with memory.

When the researchers followed 515 adults for up to 18 years, they discovered that even a one-time measurement that spots a failing sense of smell is predictive of greater cognitive decline 15 years later.

There are, of course, other causes of smell loss: nasal polyps, deviated septum, allergies, COVID-19, and other infections. It's also linked to diabetes, obesity, smoking, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson's.

But if it happens suddenly and doesn't go away, see your doctor for a diagnosis.

Although there is no cure for Alzheimer's, you can slow the development and progression of mild cognitive impairment with aerobic activity, social engagement, a plant-based diet (with salmon and sea trout), and lifelong learning.

Use good sense to protect your scents, and check out "The Great Age Reboot" for more on how to protect your brain.

© King Features Syndicate


DrRoizen
If you aren't having any cognition problems but your ability to smell is fading fast, it’s a strong predictor your brain is undergoing changes that are features of Alzheimer's disease.
alzheimers smell, obesity, dr. roizen
250
2022-51-06
Thursday, 06 October 2022 11:51 AM
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