Dr. Mehmet Oz is host of the popular TV show “The Dr. Oz Show.” He is a professor in the Department of Surgery at Columbia University and directs the Cardiovascular Institute and Complementary Medicine Program and New York-Presbyterian Hospital.

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Tags: takeout | diabetes | saturated fat | dr. oz

Beware of Excess Calories in Takeout

By and Friday, 23 October 2020 12:11 PM Current | Bio | Archive

By now you've probably heard that an Irish court ruled the dough used to make Subway's sandwiches does not get to be called "bread." It has too much sugar in it, and is more of a dessert than a dinner.

Clearly, it's easy to get tricked into thinking the food you're ordering for delivery or pickup is healthier than it is. Beautiful photos and artful descriptions can disguise the nutritional reality.

For example, Applebee's Oriental Chicken Salad is full of good-sounding chicken tenders on Asian greens along with rice noodles, almonds, and an Asian-flavored vinaigrette. But it clocks in at 1,440 calories.

Red Lobster's Create Your Own Combo may sound innocuous, but it offers shrimp three ways with sides and a beverage for 3,600 calories, 37 grams of saturated fat, and 6,530 mg of sodium.

Your best shot at eating healthy is to make the food yourself. One study found that people who eat 11-14 homemade meals per week have a 13% lower risk of developing Type 2 diabetes than those who eat fewer than six each week.

Another study found that home-cooked meals serve up fewer calories and fat than out-of-house meals.

Takeout has exploded during the pandemic. It's up to you to check online menus for nutritional information.

Stay away from anything with red meat, creamy sauce, or that is described as fried, breaded, sweet, honey, or maple.

Decide what to order and eat based on calorie, fat, carb, and sodium content — not just how food looks in photos.

© King Features Syndicate


   
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One study found that people who eat 11-14 homemade meals per week have a 13% lower risk of developing Type 2 diabetes than those who eat fewer than six each week
takeout, diabetes, saturated fat, dr. oz
251
2020-11-23
Friday, 23 October 2020 12:11 PM
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