Dr. Mehmet Oz is host of the popular TV show “The Dr. Oz Show.” He is a professor in the Department of Surgery at Columbia University and directs the Cardiovascular Institute and Complementary Medicine Program and New York-Presbyterian Hospital.

Dr. Mike Roizen is chief medical officer at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute, an award-winning author, and has been the doctor to eight Nobel Prize winners and more than 100 Fortune 500 CEOs.

 

Dr. Mehmet Oz,Dr. Mike Roizen

Tags: sleep | obesity | smell Dr. Oz

Why Poor Sleep Leads to Obesity

By and
Monday, 11 November 2019 11:43 AM Current | Bio | Archive

Multitalented vaudevillian Jimmy Durante (1893-1980) often made fun of his oversized nose by calling it his “schnozzola.”

He also loved to declare, “The nose knows.”

But Jimmy probably didn't have a clue that the nose might know a bit too much if you're sleep-deprived.

When you're tired, you may seek out high-energy, calorie-dense foods — and it's your nose that tracks them down.

But how does sleep deprivation sharpen your sense of smell? It happens in the brain.

Using an MRI scan, researchers discovered that two parts of the brain that control food intake don't communicate very well if you've only had four hours of sleep.

When sleep-deprived participants were presented with an array of food choices, the foods that smelled most desirable were those loaded with fats and sugars.

In the U.S., 30% of people sleep less than six hours a night. That's around the same percentage of Americans who are obese.

Coincidence?

If you’re struggling with your weight and are chronically sleep-deprived, we've got a plan for you: Train your nose to love healthy foods.

Start with what you like. Garlicky salmon burgers or salad greens, for instance. Get into the aromas.

Then tickle your schnozzola with foods that seem more exotic to you. Fennel or cod, perhaps. You can learn to sniff out what's good for you.

In addition, go to bed earlier and make your bedroom quiet (no TV or digital stuff). You'll feel better and shed a few pounds.

© King Features Syndicate

   
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Dr-Oz
Using an MRI scan, researchers discovered that two parts of the brain that control food intake don't communicate very well if you've only had four hours of sleep.
sleep, obesity, smell Dr. Oz
243
2019-43-11
Monday, 11 November 2019 11:43 AM
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