Dr. Mehmet Oz is host of the popular TV show “The Dr. Oz Show.” He is a professor in the Department of Surgery at Columbia University and directs the Cardiovascular Institute and Complementary Medicine Program and New York-Presbyterian Hospital.

Dr. Mike Roizen is chief medical officer at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute, an award-winning author, and has been the doctor to eight Nobel Prize winners and more than 100 Fortune 500 CEOs.

 

Dr. Mehmet Oz,Dr. Mike Roizen

Tags: selfies | hepatitis | heart disease | Dr. Oz

Selfie Dangers: Not Worth the Risk

By and
Friday, 19 July 2019 12:14 PM Current | Bio | Archive

Basketball player LeBron James, snowboarder Shaun White, and tennis player Caroline Wozniacki something in common: They're notorious selfie-takers.

There's nothing inherently wrong with taking selfies. In fact, sometimes they're downright diagnostic. If you or a friend notices that you have yellowed eyes, you could uncover hepatitis or another liver disease; and seeing yellowish spots on your eyelids, called xanthelasma, can alert you to fat deposits that may indicate a risk for heart disease.

But selfies can be health hazards too.

From 2011 to 2017, more than 250 people worldwide died while taking a selfie. According to a San Francisco research firm, the average age of victims was 22, and 75% were male.

People have fallen off buildings and cliffs, drowned in rivers, been hit by trains, and been electrocuted. One Russian was even mauled by a wounded bear.

Selfies can put others in danger as well. In the U.S., a 2015 survey found that 4% of drivers admit to taking selfies while driving.

Some places have had to legislate against selfies: In Mumbai, India, there are 16 “no selfie” zones, and the BBC reports that Russia started a “Safe Selfie” campaign with the catchphrase “Even a million 'likes' on social media are not worth your life and well-being.”

So stick with selfies that are safe and delightful. A picture may be worth a thousand words, but it’s not worth risking your life or safety for.

© King Features Syndicate

   
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From 2011 to 2017, more than 250 people worldwide died while taking a selfie. According to a San Francisco research firm, the average age of victims was 22, and 75% were male.
selfies, hepatitis, heart disease, Dr. Oz
235
2019-14-19
Friday, 19 July 2019 12:14 PM
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