Dr. Mehmet Oz is host of the popular TV show “The Dr. Oz Show.” He is a professor in the Department of Surgery at Columbia University and directs the Cardiovascular Institute and Complementary Medicine Program and New York-Presbyterian Hospital.

Dr. Mike Roizen is chief medical officer at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute, an award-winning author, and has been the doctor to eight Nobel Prize winners and more than 100 Fortune 500 CEOs.

 

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Tags: high blood pressure | loneliness | stroke dr. oz

Surprise Triggers for High Blood Pressure

By and Thursday, 29 October 2020 12:10 PM Current | Bio | Archive

New York Post gossip columnist Earl Wilson once said, "One way to get high blood pressure is to go mountain climbing over molehills."

When it comes to high blood pressure, a lot of surprising factors — besides making mountains out of molehills — can come into play.

Did you know if you hold in your urine for, say, three hours, your blood pressure can climb?

Or that sugar may raise your blood pressure? A study in the American Journal of Cardiology found drinking more than 12 ounces of sugar-sweetened beverages a day increases your risk of high blood pressure by at least 6%, and can increase your systolic blood pressure (the top number) measurably over 18 months.

Then there's the impact of loneliness. The lack of calming interaction with people can increase stress, cause sleep problems, and lead to overeating, all of which are associated with elevated blood pressure.

One study in the journal Psychology and Aging found that over a four-year span, the loneliest people saw a 14.4-point increase in their systolic pressure number. That can put you at high risk for a stroke.

It's important to make an effort to overcome feelings of loneliness. Connect online with groups of folks with shared interests. Every subject, from gardening to photography, world history, and pet reptiles has a chatroom; talk on the phone with and safely see friends and relatives; and volunteer to help others — a new study shows increased compassion counteracts loneliness.

And always keep tabs on your blood pressure.

© King Features Syndicate


   
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One study in the journal Psychology and Aging found that over a four-year span, the loneliest people saw a 14.4-point increase in their systolic pressure number.
high blood pressure, loneliness, stroke dr. oz
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2020-10-29
Thursday, 29 October 2020 12:10 PM
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