Dr. Mehmet Oz is host of the popular TV show “The Dr. Oz Show.” He is a professor in the Department of Surgery at Columbia University and directs the Cardiovascular Institute and Complementary Medicine Program and New York-Presbyterian Hospital.

Dr. Mike Roizen is chief medical officer at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute, an award-winning author, and has been the doctor to eight Nobel Prize winners and more than 100 Fortune 500 CEOs.

 

Dr. Mehmet Oz,Dr. Mike Roizen

Tags: alcohol | cancer | heart disease | Dr. Oz

Is Drinking Endangering Your Health?

By and Wednesday, 26 February 2020 11:50 AM Current | Bio | Archive

Singer Amy Winehouse was 27 when she was found unresponsive at home. A postmortem exam revealed her cause of death was alcohol poisoning.

She had a blood alcohol level that was more than five times the legal limit for driving.

That incident was a stark reminder of something many folks forget: Alcohol is a drug, and the short- and long-term results of consuming it can be deadly.

Unfortunately, risky drinking is increasing. The National Institutes of Health reports that the number of deaths linked to alcohol more than doubled between 1999 and 2017.

Nearly 1 million people died from acute conditions such as alcohol poisoning, and alcohol-related chronic health conditions, including liver disease, pancreatitis, heart disease, and psychiatric disorders, as well as car accidents.

Current guidelines describe moderate drinking as one drink per day for women and up to two drinks per day for men.

However, there's mounting evidence that the safest amount of alcohol may be none at all. A large-scale global study found that alcohol is linked to cancer far more than previously thought, and alcohol is the seventh-leading risk factor for death worldwide.

If you do drink, pay attention to serving size and don't exceed the recommended daily intake. A standard drink is generally one 12-ounce glass of beer, 8 ounces of malt liquor, 5 ounces of wine, or a single shot — that's 1.5 ounces of 80 proof (40%) alcohol.

And remember that those recommendations are for daily intake, so don't think you can add the drink you skipped yesterday to today's dose.

© King Features Syndicate


   
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Unfortunately, risky drinking is increasing. The National Institutes of Health reports that the number of deaths linked to alcohol more than doubled between 1999 and 2017.
alcohol, cancer, heart disease, Dr. Oz
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2020-50-26
Wednesday, 26 February 2020 11:50 AM
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