Drs. Mehmet Oz and Dr. Mike Roizen
Dr. Mehmet Oz is host of the popular TV show “The Dr. Oz Show.” He is a professor in the Department of Surgery at Columbia University and directs the Cardiovascular Institute and Complementary Medicine Program and New York-Presbyterian Hospital.

Dr. Mike Roizen is chief medical officer at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute, an award-winning author, and has been the doctor to eight Nobel Prize winners and more than 100 Fortune 500 CEOs.

Dr. Mehmet Oz,Dr. Mike Roizen

Tags: acid reflux | migraine | medications | dr. oz
OPINION

Acid Reflux Meds Increase Migraine Risk

Dr. Mehmet Oz, M.D. and Dr. Mike Roizen, M.D. By Tuesday, 21 May 2024 11:44 AM EDT Current | Bio | Archive

In 1959, Bristol-Meyers advertised its buffered over-the-counter pain reliever with the catchy phrase: "Don't trade a headache for an upset stomach."

Fast-forward almost 65 years and researchers from the University of Maryland are asking, "Are you trading an upset stomach for a headache?"

Their new study reveals that common drugs taken for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) or acid reflux — such as the proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) Nexium and Prevacid, or H2 blockers Tagamet and Pepcid — increase your risk of migraine headaches.

The researchers looked at data on almost 12,000 people and found that those taking PPIs were 70% more likely to have migraines than people not taking the medication, and those taking H2 blockers were 40% more likely.

About 15 million Americans take a PPI each year, and millions of others use H2 blockers. That's a lot of potential headaches.

Because chronic acid reflux can cause complications including esophageal cancer, it’s important to work with your doctor to tamp down symptoms or eradicate the condition (surgery can sometimes help).

But there's a lot you can do to ease heartburn, such as avoiding food triggers and eating smaller meals more frequently. It's also important to reduce your waist size if you're overweight or obese to relieve pressure on your stomach.

And try sleeping with your head elevated — but don't lie down for at least two hours after eating.

© King Features Syndicate


Dr-Oz
Researchers found that people taking PPIs were 70% more likely to have migraines than people not taking the medications, and those taking H2 blockers were 40% more likely.
acid reflux, migraine, medications, dr. oz
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2024-44-21
Tuesday, 21 May 2024 11:44 AM
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