Chauncey W. Crandall, M.D., F.A.C.C.

Dr. Chauncey W. Crandall, author of Dr. Crandall’s Heart Health Report newsletter, is chief of the Cardiac Transplant Program at the world-renowned Palm Beach Cardiovascular Clinic in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. He practices interventional, vascular, and transplant cardiology. Dr. Crandall received his post-graduate training at Yale University School of Medicine, where he also completed three years of research in the Cardiovascular Surgery Division. Dr. Crandall regularly lectures nationally and internationally on preventive cardiology, cardiology healthcare of the elderly, healing, interventional cardiology, and heart transplants. Known as the “Christian physician,” Dr. Crandall has been heralded for his values and message of hope to all his heart patients.

Tags: metabolism | diet | diabetes | dr. crandall
OPINION

Good Diet Better Than Drugs for Metabolic Health

Chauncey Crandall, M.D. By Wednesday, 24 April 2024 04:26 PM EDT Current | Bio | Archive

Too often, healthcare professionals look to drugs to maintain metabolic health, a key factor in aging and chronic disease. But it’s what you eat that can cause — or prevent — these conditions from developing in the first place.

Researchers at the University of Sydney in Australia performed a study to determine whether drugs or what we eat have a greater effect on aging and chronic diseases such as diabetes. The research, which was published in the journal Cell Metabolism, builds on the team’s pioneering work on mice and humans that demonstrated how protective diet can be. However, lead researcher Professor Stephen Simpson noted that there is also a push to develop drugs that improve metabolic health and aging, without a person having to make dietary changes.

This complex mouse study involved 40 different treatments, each with varying levels of protein, fat, and carbohydrate balance, calories, and drug content. It was designed to examine the impact of three anti-aging drugs on the liver, which is a key organ in the regulation of metabolism.

The researchers found calorie intake and the balance of macronutrients (protein, fats, and carbohydrates) in the diet had a strong impact on the liver. Protein and total calorie intake had a particularly powerful effect not just on metabolic pathways, but also on fundamental processes that control the way our cells function. By comparison, the drugs mainly acted to dampen the cell’s metabolic responses to diet, rather than fundamentally reshaping them.

The study showed that “diet is powerful medicine,” according to Simpson. On the other hand, drugs are too often administered without considering whether or how they may interact with the metabolism of food.

This study is a strong argument that shows heart healthy eating, with an emphasis on lean proteins (such as fish), lots of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, fat-free dairy, and “good” fats, like olive oil, are a bigger payoff than drugs.

© 2024 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved.


Dr-Crandall
Too often, healthcare professionals look to drugs to maintain metabolic health, a key factor in aging and chronic disease. But it’s what you eat that can cause — or prevent — these conditions from developing in the first place.
metabolism, diet, diabetes, dr. crandall
315
2024-26-24
Wednesday, 24 April 2024 04:26 PM
Newsmax Media, Inc.

Sign up for Newsmax’s Daily Newsletter

Receive breaking news and original analysis - sent right to your inbox.

(Optional for Local News)
Privacy: We never share your email address.
Join the Newsmax Community
Read and Post Comments
Please review Community Guidelines before posting a comment.
 
Find Your Condition
Get Newsmax Text Alerts
TOP

The information presented on this website is not intended as specific medical advice and is not a substitute for professional medical treatment or diagnosis. Read Newsmax Terms and Conditions of Service.

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved
NEWSMAX.COM
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved