Dr. Chauncey W. Crandall, author of Dr. Crandall’s Heart Health Report newsletter, is chief of the Cardiac Transplant Program at the world-renowned Palm Beach Cardiovascular Clinic in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. He practices interventional, vascular, and transplant cardiology. Dr. Crandall received his post-graduate training at Yale University School of Medicine, where he also completed three years of research in the Cardiovascular Surgery Division. Dr. Crandall regularly lectures nationally and internationally on preventive cardiology, cardiology healthcare of the elderly, healing, interventional cardiology, and heart transplants. Known as the “Christian physician,” Dr. Crandall has been heralded for his values and message of hope to all his heart patients.

Tags: heart health | arrythmias | pacemaker

Next Generation of Heart Devices

By Wednesday, 13 May 2020 03:47 PM Current | Bio | Archive

The pacemaker itself isn’t the only part of this system that has undergone changes. There have also been huge advancements in the way your cardiologist can monitor your heartbeat.

It used to be that a patient with a pacemaker had to make regular trips to the doctor’s office to ensure that the device was functioning properly.

Now, when a person gets a pacemaker, he or she receives a remote home monitoring system that works with either a traditional telephone or a cell phone.

The home system transmits information about your heartbeat directly to the doctor’s office. It can be done daily, but patients are usually put on a lighter schedule so that the doctor isn’t receiving an overwhelming amount of information.

Your doctor will also receive alerts in the event of a heartbeat irregularity.

The leads of the pacemaker, which transmit signals to the heart, are the most problematic parts of the device because they can cause bleeding and/or infection. Medtronic’s “Micra” is currently the world’s smallest, leadless pacemaker — the calcium pill-size device I noted.

Traditionally, pacemakers are inserted in a pocket under the skin. The Micra, however, is threaded in a minimally invasive procedure directly into one of the heart’s lower chambers, the ventricles.

The drawback is that the Micra can only be used on people who need to regulate the beating of their ventricles. It won’t work for people with atrial arrythmias.

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The pacemaker itself isn’t the only part of this system that has undergone changes. There have also been huge advancements in the way your cardiologist can monitor your heartbeat.
heart health, arrythmias, pacemaker
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2020-47-13
Wednesday, 13 May 2020 03:47 PM
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