Chauncey W. Crandall, M.D., F.A.C.C.

Dr. Chauncey W. Crandall, author of Dr. Crandall’s Heart Health Report newsletter, is chief of the Cardiac Transplant Program at the world-renowned Palm Beach Cardiovascular Clinic in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. He practices interventional, vascular, and transplant cardiology. Dr. Crandall received his post-graduate training at Yale University School of Medicine, where he also completed three years of research in the Cardiovascular Surgery Division. Dr. Crandall regularly lectures nationally and internationally on preventive cardiology, cardiology healthcare of the elderly, healing, interventional cardiology, and heart transplants. Known as the “Christian physician,” Dr. Crandall has been heralded for his values and message of hope to all his heart patients.

Tags: breastfeeding | heart disease | stroke | dr | crandall
OPINION

Breastfeeding Protects Mothers' Hearts

Chauncey Crandall, M.D. By Wednesday, 17 April 2024 03:57 PM EDT Current | Bio | Archive

Moms who breastfeed may reap big health benefits. Compared to women who had babies but never breastfed, mothers who breastfed for any period of time were less likely to develop heart disease, have a stroke, or die from heart disease during 10 years of follow-up.

For the study, researchers analyzed information on close to 1.2 million women in eight studies conducted between 1986 and 2009 across several countries. They looked at how long women breastfed, how many children they had, their age at first birth, and whether they had a heart attack or a stroke during follow-up.

Fully 82 percent breastfed at some point. These women were 11 percent less likely to develop heart disease, 12 percent less likely to have a stroke, and 17 percent less likely to die from heart disease during 10 years of follow-up. These benefits held for women who breastfed for any length of time and were even greater for those who breastfed for up to one year.

The study can’t say whether breastfeeding for even longer periods is more beneficial because there weren’t enough women in the study who breastfed for more than two years.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that infants be exclusively breastfed for around the first six months of life.

© 2024 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved.


Dr-Crandall
Compared to women who had babies but never breastfed, mothers who breastfed for any period of time were less likely to develop heart disease, have a stroke, or die from heart disease during 10 years of follow-up.
breastfeeding, heart disease, stroke, dr, crandall
210
2024-57-17
Wednesday, 17 April 2024 03:57 PM
Newsmax Media, Inc.

Sign up for Newsmax’s Daily Newsletter

Receive breaking news and original analysis - sent right to your inbox.

(Optional for Local News)
Privacy: We never share your email address.
Join the Newsmax Community
Read and Post Comments
Please review Community Guidelines before posting a comment.
 
Find Your Condition
Get Newsmax Text Alerts
TOP

The information presented on this website is not intended as specific medical advice and is not a substitute for professional medical treatment or diagnosis. Read Newsmax Terms and Conditions of Service.

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved
NEWSMAX.COM
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved