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Chauncey W. Crandall, M.D., F.A.C.C.

Dr. Chauncey W. Crandall, author of Dr. Crandall’s Heart Health Report newsletter, is chief of the Cardiac Transplant Program at the world-renowned Palm Beach Cardiovascular Clinic in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. He practices interventional, vascular, and transplant cardiology. Dr. Crandall received his post-graduate training at Yale University School of Medicine, where he also completed three years of research in the Cardiovascular Surgery Division. Dr. Crandall regularly lectures nationally and internationally on preventive cardiology, cardiology healthcare of the elderly, healing, interventional cardiology, and heart transplants. Known as the “Christian physician,” Dr. Crandall has been heralded for his values and message of hope to all his heart patients.

Tags: blue light | sleep | body clock | melatonin

Blue Light and Your Body Clock

Chauncey Crandall, M.D. By Wednesday, 06 July 2022 04:28 PM EDT Current | Bio | Archive

Not all colors of light have the same effect. Blue wavelengths — which are beneficial during daylight hours — can disturb sleep at night.

Blue light is found in compact fluorescent and LED lights that are replacing less-efficient incandescent bulbs. Blue light also illuminates smartphones, tablets, and laptops.

A study at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston found that subjects who read e-books on a light-emitting tablet screen for four hours before bed each night took longer to fall asleep and spent less time in REM sleep; had reduced secretion of melatonin, a hormone that induces sleepiness; and had a delayed circadian rhythm. They were also sleepier and less alert the following morning.

Here are some tips for dealing with blue light:

• Expose yourself to lots of bright light during the day.

• Use dim red lights for nightlights.

• Avoid looking at bright screens 2 to 3 hours before bed.

© 2022 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved.


Dr-Crandall
Not all colors of light have the same effect. Blue wavelengths — which are beneficial during daylight hours — can disturb sleep at night.
blue light, sleep, body clock, melatonin
150
2022-28-06
Wednesday, 06 July 2022 04:28 PM
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