Tags: stand | boost | work | productivity | desk

Want to Boost Work Productivity? Stand Up

Want to Boost Work Productivity? Stand Up
(Copyright AP)

By    |   Thursday, 26 May 2016 12:25 PM


Leonardo da Vinci is best known for his art and inventions, but he's also known for using a standing desk, as did Winston Churchill, Thomas Jefferson, and Benjamin Franklin. Writers Ernest Hemmingway, Thomas Wolfe, Virginia Wolfe, and Charles Dickens all believed standing helped get their creative juices flowing. In modern times, hundreds of workers at Facebook use standing desks.

Several studies have indicated that using standing desks helps burn more calories and fights obesity, and improves attention and cognitive functioning in students. Now, a study from Texas A&M Health Science Center School of Public Health indicates that standing desks may boost productivity in adults.

Researchers examined the productivity differences between two groups of call center employees over the course of six months. Productivity was measured by how many successful calls workers completed for each hour they worked.

They found that workers who could raise or lower their desks as they wanted during the day sat for about 1.6 hours less every day that those bound to their desks. Statistics showed that workers who used standing desks were about 46 percent more productive than using traditional desks where they remained seated throughout the work day.

"We hope this work will show companies that although there might be some costs involved in providing stand-capable workstations, increased employee productivity over time will more than offset these initial expenses," said Mark Benden, Ph.D., associate professor at the Texas A&M School of Public Health, and one of the authors of the study.

"One interesting result of the study is that the productivity differences between the stand-capable and seated groups were not as large during the first month," said the study's lead author Gregory Garrett. "Starting with the second month, we began to see larger increases in productivity with the stand-capable groups as they became habituated to their standing desks."

At the end of the six-month study, almost 75 percent of those working at stand-capable workstations experienced a decrease in muscle aches and pains.

"We believe that decreases in body discomfort may account for some of the productivity differences between the two groups," Garrett said. "However, standing desks may have an impact on cognitive performance, which is the focus of some of our research going forward."

The study was published in the journal IIE Transactions on Occupational Ergonomics and Human Factors.

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Leonardo da Vinci is best known for his art and inventions, but he's also known for using a standing desk, as did Winston Churchill, Thomas Jefferson, and Benjamin Franklin. Writers Ernest Hemmingway, Thomas Wolfe, Virginia Wolfe, and Charles Dickens all believed standing...
stand, boost, work, productivity, desk
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2016-25-26
Thursday, 26 May 2016 12:25 PM
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