Tags: Cancer | obesity | related | cancer | drug

Drug Shows Promise Against Obesity-Related Cancer

Drug Shows Promise Against Obesity-Related Cancer
(Copyright DPC)

By    |   Thursday, 21 January 2016 10:18 AM

A drug used to treat digestive disorders may hold promise in preventing obesity-related colorectal cancer, the sixth leading cause of cancer death in the U.S.

A research team led by investigators at Thomas Jefferson University has revealed the biological connection between obesity and colorectal cancer and determined that the drug linaclotide (Linzess) might prevent the disease’s development.

The findings, published in the journal Cancer Research, are based on experiments involving mice, but hold great promise for people, too, the resesearchers said.

"Our study suggests that colorectal cancer can be prevented in obese individuals with use of hormone replacement therapy — much as other diseases associated with hormone deficiency, such as loss of insulin in diabetes, can be treated," said lead researcher Dr. Scott Waldman.

"These findings came as a surprise — we and many other researchers worldwide have been trying to disentangle obesity from development of colorectal cancer. Calories sit in the middle of these two conditions, but the question of what they were doing has been one of the most perplexing and provocative questions in cancer research.”

In the new study, Dr. Waldman’s team found a high-calorie diet turns switches off the action of a key hormone in the intestine that can increase the risk for cancer. But turning the hormone back — through the use of the drug Linzess — reactivates it and helps prevent cancer development, even when mice continued to eat excess calories.

Linzess is structurally related to the lost hormone and holds promise as a therapeutic approach to preventing colorectal cancer in obese patients, said Dr. Waldman.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved linaclotide in 2012 to treat irritable bowel syndrome with constipation as well as chronic idiopathic constipation (chronic constipation from unknown causes).

"Now we finally have a big clue as to the origin of colorectal cancer in obese individuals and perhaps in other people as well," he said, noting obesity raises the risk of developing colorectal cancer by 50 percent.

The study was funded, in part, by the National Institutes of Health.

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A drug used to treat digestive disorders holds promise in preventing obesity-related colorectal cancer. A research team has revealed the biological connection between obesity and colorectal cancer and determined that the drug linaclotide might prevent the disease’s development.
obesity, related, cancer, drug
336
2016-18-21
Thursday, 21 January 2016 10:18 AM
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