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Fluoride Linked to Diabetes

Fluoride Linked to Diabetes

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By    |   Thursday, 18 August 2016 02:47 PM


Millions of Americans drink fluoridated water every day. It was added to public drinking water in the 1940s in an effort to reduce cavities, but the practice has been a controversial subject for decades. Although both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Dental Association say adding fluoride to drinking water is safe and effective, some experts believe it causes long-term health problems. A new study seems to agree, tying fluoridation to the increase in Type 2 diabetes.

The new study examined the links between water fluoridation and Type 2 diabetes, which has reached epidemic proportion in the United States. The numbers of people with the disease have almost quadrupled in the last three decades and are still rising. The study, which was published in the Journal of Water and Health, found that fluoridation with sodium fluoride could be contributing to the rise in diabetes.

Neurosurgeon Dr. Blaylock, author of The Blaylock Wellness Report, has warned of the dangers of fluoridated water for years, and believes it can cause a wide range of diseases. "Degenerative brain diseases such as Alzheimer’s are possibly linked to drinking fluoridated water," he says.

Dr. Blaylock also warns of the possibility of cancer, behavioral problems, thyroid suppression, male infertility and impotence as examples of diseases that could be caused by fluoride.

For the study, researchers used mathematical models to analyze publicly available data on fluoride water levels and diabetes incidence and prevalence rates across 22 states. Adjustments for obesity and physical inactivity were taken into consideration using data collected from national telephone surveys.

The models suggested that supplemental water fluoridation was significantly associated with increases in diabetes between 2005 and 2010.

Researcher Kyle Fluegge reported that a one milligram increase in average county fluoride levels predicted a 0.17 percent increase in age-adjusted diabetes prevalence.

Fluegge performed the study as a post-doctoral fellow at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine.

Closer observation revealed differences between the types of fluoride additives used by each region. The additives linked to diabetes in the analyses included sodium fluoride and sodium fluorosilicate. However, fluorosilicic acid seemed to have an opposing effect and was associated with decreases in diabetes incidence and prevalence. Also, counties that relied on naturally occurring fluoride in their water and did not supplement with fluoride additives also had lower diabetes rates.

"The models indicate that natural environmental fluoride has a protective effect from diabetes," Fluegge said. "Unfortunately, natural fluoride is not universally present in the water supply."
 

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Millions of Americans drink fluoridated water every day. It was added to public drinking water in the 1940s in an effort to reduce cavities, but the practice has been a controversial subject for decades. Although both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the...
fluoride, link, diabetes, water, drinking, cavities
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2016-47-18
Thursday, 18 August 2016 02:47 PM
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