Tags: Alzheimer's/Dementia | alzheimers | subtypes | study | UCLA

Study Identifies Three Types of Alzheimer's

Image: Study Identifies Three Types of Alzheimer's
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By    |   Thursday, 17 Sep 2015 04:01 PM

Long thought to be a single disease, Alzheimer’s may actually occur in three different forms, a new study suggests.

There is an urgent need to find an effective treatment for Alzheimer’s disease, which is the most common age-related cause of dementia in the U.S. The number of Americans afflicted is expected to grow from six million today to 15 million in 2050.

Alzheimer’s symptoms vary widely from person to person, which has led experts to suspect that there is more than one form of the brain illness, says Dr. Dale Bredesen, a UCLA neurology professor and the author of a new study.

His team looked at the results of metabolic testing on 50 people with early Alzheimer’s disease or its precursor and identified three subtypes:

Inflammatory, in which markers such as C-reactive protein and serum albumin to globulin ratios are increased.

Non-inflammatory, in which these markers are not increased but other metabolic abnormalities are present.

Cortical, which affects relatively young individuals and is more widely distributed across the brain than the other subtypes. It typically does not cause memory loss at first, but people with this subtype tend to lose language skills.

Dr. Bredesen said the study, published in the journal Aging, may help lead to effective treatments that can be targeted to Alzheimer’s subtypes.

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Long thought to be a single disease, Alzheimer's may actually occur in three different forms, a new study suggests. There is an urgent need to find an effective treatment for Alzheimer's disease, which is the most common age-related cause of dementia in the U.S.The number...
alzheimers, subtypes, study, UCLA
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2015-01-17
Thursday, 17 Sep 2015 04:01 PM
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