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Tags: sugar | depression | anxiety | Dr. Oz

Added Sugars Damage Mental Health

Dr. Mehmet Oz, M.D. and Dr. Mike Roizen, M.D. By Wednesday, 23 August 2017 04:15 PM EDT Current | Bio | Archive

Kaunistellaan (Finnish), Elsen chikhereer bursen (Mongolian), tsuker-koutad (Yiddish): No matter what language you use to sugarcoat (that's what those words mean), the harm added sugar does to your body, the real facts keep spilling out.

Chances are, you already know that added sugars and syrups fuel obesity, elevate triglycerides, cause cardio woes, trigger excess insulin secretion and boost inflammation.

But did you know that they can amp up your risk for mental health issues, too?

A new study in Scientific Reports looked at information collected from 1985 to 2013 on more than 10,000 participants.

They found that over a five-year period, men with the highest sugar intake from foods and beverages — more than 2.3 ounces (70 grams) daily — had a 23 percent increase in the risk of common mental health problems such as depression and anxiety, no matter how well or how poorly they took care of themselves or what their sociodemographic characteristics were.

This adds to lab-generated info on other mental health challenges that added sugar causes. It can trigger addictive behavior and cognitive decline.

One study showed that it fueled food addiction; another found that rats preferred sugar water to cocaine.

Yet another lab study found that a sugar-boosted diet can make rats forget how to get through a maze.

So if you want to keep your sweet attitude and a sharp brain, get tough on sugar. Check all ingredient labels for sugar, syrups, maltose and fructose, any malt, even agave. Leave it on the grocery-store shelf.

That'll leave you smart and smiling.

© 2023 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved.


Dr-Oz
Researchers found that men with the highest sugar intake from foods and beverages had a 23 percent increase in the risk of common mental health problems such as depression and anxiety.
sugar, depression, anxiety, Dr. Oz
255
2017-15-23
Wednesday, 23 August 2017 04:15 PM
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