Tags: Barack Obama | Iraq | ISIS/Islamic State | Syria | ground troops | war powers | obama

Obama to Ask Wednesday for Right to Use Troops in ISIS Fight

Obama to Ask Wednesday for Right to Use Troops in ISIS Fight
(Kevin Dietsch/UPI/Landov)

By    |   Tuesday, 10 February 2015 07:39 AM

The White House this week will petition Congress to authorize military operations against the Islamic State, triggering a debate about the nature and extent of the use of force against the militant group more than six months after airstrikes began.

Officials told The Wall Street Journal that the Obama administration on Wednesday will offer Congress a legislative proposal that will outline the parameters of engagement, forcing lawmakers to reach a consensus on America's role in the conflict.

Lawmakers and congressional aides have said they expect authorization would run for three years and will attempt to confront the issue of when and how U.S. ground troops may be used in the conflict, the Journal said.

Last week, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi said the challenge for Congress will revolve around defining the elements of authorization.

"What is the language around 'boots on the ground,' 'enduring combat,' 'engagement' … these are all different things," she said, according to the Journal.

The move to seek authorization for the use of military force (AUMF) will go some way in appeasing the demands of a group of lawmakers who have emphasized the importance of Congress exercising its constitutional powers to declare war, the Journal said.

"Congress should authorize the use of force against the Islamic State — not only to put to rest any legal questions about the president's power to use force, but also to demonstrate to the world America's resolve in this fight against terror," Republican Sen. Orrin Hatch of Utah said on the Senate floor Monday, according to the Journal.

The White House has been aggressive in its outreach to lawmakers in an attempt to reach a broad bipartisan consensus, meeting with GOP and Democratic lawmakers, chiefs of staff, and aides to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and House Speaker John Boehner, according to Politico.

The debate over the new measure could last for weeks or possibly months, lawmakers and administration officials told Politico, and the AUMF text is still under review.

"On the whole, the consultations have been productive and well-received," a source familiar with the White House outreach efforts told Politico.

"Even members who have expressed some disagreement with the administration's approach have noted they appreciate the thoughtful and constructive way in which the White House has gone about seeking their input and engaging in a meaningful discussion on specific aspects of the language."

The source added, "Furthermore, consultations are ongoing with additional Republicans and Democrats, and we have worked hard to accommodate various scheduling challenges of members, as well.

"The final text of the AUMF and timing for delivery will not be locked until we are able to complete these robust consultations and consider all of the feedback we have received."

A new war resolution, however, will highlight divisions between those keen to avoid any scenario that would open to door to the use of ground troops, versus those who want to make sure the president isn't restricted in his ability to respond to an evolving conflict.

The specific language about the use of ground troops will be a major focus in the measure's navigation and ultimate approval through Congress.

"There's this tension on those who want to give the executive [branch] a blank check, and those who want to place limits on war-making power, especially with respect to the deployment of American ground troops," Maryland Democratic Rep. Chris Van Hollen told Politico.

"At the end of the day, this may be a needle that's impossible to thread."

The White House is hoping to avoid a repeat of the 2013 debacle in which both parties balked at its proposal to authorize military strikes against Syria, Politico noted.

The top Democrat on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, New Jersey Sen. Robert Menendez, has said that the current AUMF proposals will have more "flexibility" than language approved by the committee in December, according to The Hill.

The AUMF passed by the committee in December authorized the president to use military force against ISIS for up to three years and banned U.S. troops from participating in ground operations except in specific circumstances.

Menendez acknowledged the challenge of getting bipartisan support.

"So that's the rub here, to find an AUMF that can have bipartisan support, that can be narrow enough that it's not an open-ended check and prolong engagement, and open enough so it can meet the challenge of fighting ISIL," he said, according to The Hill.

"Finding the balance is the challenge here."

© 2019 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

   
1Like our page
2Share
Headline
The White House this week will petition Congress to authorize military operations against the Islamic State, triggering a debate about the nature and extent of the use of force against the militant group more than six months after airstrikes began.
ground troops, war powers, obama, isis, congress
742
2015-39-10
Tuesday, 10 February 2015 07:39 AM
Newsmax Media, Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved