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Tags: Gun Control | hunting | north carolina | landowners | private

Hunting in North Carolina: 4 Things for Landowners to Know About Hunting on Private Property

By    |   Thursday, 28 May 2015 05:31 PM

When hunting in North Carolina, there are plenty of state parks and forest areas to hunt for deer, bears, and small game. However, there is also a chance to hunt for other small game animals, such as the foxes, coyotes, feral swine, and more on private lands.

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In North Carolina, there are a lot of rules and regulations when it comes to hunting on private property and landowners have protection under state laws when it comes to hunting on their private lands.

1. Landowner Protection Act

The key law in the state of North Carolina for hunting on private property is the Landowner Protection Act from 2011. This law clarifies the trespassing laws in the state for the purpose of hunting, fishing, and trapping. This law requires that all hunters, fishermen and trappers receive written consent to hunt, fish, or trap on private lands as long as the land has posted signs. This does not change the trespass laws on private lands where there is no postings. The main change with this act is to allow wildlife officers the right to issue a citation on site without obtaining a warrant.

2. Purple Paint

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North Carolina has optioned to allow purple paint to post private property for hunting purposes. This is allowed because it is convenient and less likely to be vandalized than signs. All paint marks need to be a vertical line of eight inches or more and should be between three and five feet high on trees or posts. An example of the purple paint procedure can be found on the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission website.

3. Landowner Permission Form

If a landowner allows a hunter, fisherman or trapper to hunt on their private property, a written permission form must be filled out and kept on the hunter, fisherman or trapper's person. A sample form is available to print out on the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission website.

4. Landowner Liability

Even if the landowner allows a hunter onto their private property for hunting in North Carolina, they are not held liable for injuries any more than they would be for an actual trespasser. The only way that this changes is if the landowner charges the hunter, fisherman or trapper to come on their land. The landowner is also liable for injuries due to malicious behavior or purposeful neglect to warn of known dangers on their land.

This article is for information only. Please check current regulations before hunting.

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FastFeatures
When hunting in North Carolina, there are plenty of state parks and forest areas to hunt for deer, bears, and small game. However, there is also a chance to hunt for other small game animals, such as the foxes, coyotes, feral swine, and more on private lands.
hunting, north carolina, landowners, private
445
2015-31-28
Thursday, 28 May 2015 05:31 PM
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