Tags: Marijuana Legalization | Utah | edible pot | environmental impact

Utah Considers Legalizing Edible Medical Marijuana

By    |   Monday, 02 Mar 2015 03:26 PM

The Utah Senate this week is scheduled to debate legislation permitting patients with some debilitating conditions to be "treated with certain edible forms of marijuana," The Washington Post's Wonkblog reported Monday.

The measure has drawn opposition from the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), which argues that supporters have overlooked the damaging effect that marijuana cultivation has on the environment.

DEA Special Agent Matt Fairbanks, who has spent a decade working in Utah, spoke of his time eliminating back-country marijuana cultivation efforts in the Utah mountains. He warned there are substantial environmental costs associated with large-scale cultivation of pot on public land.

"Personally, I have seen entire mountainsides subjected to pesticides, harmful chemicals, deforestation and erosion," Fairbanks said.

He added that the long-term ramifications of marijuana cultivation in terms of water pollution and harm to animals living in the area are "still unknown."

But according to the Post, the ramifications are known. Wonkblog links to an article from High Country News, which details how illegal marijuana cultivation is damaging the environment:

"In California, for example, herbicides and pesticides added to irrigation water seep into the ground and back into the local water supply, causing everything from algal blooms to total ecosystem destruction. In the coho salmon habitat of Humboldt County's mattole watershed, hundreds of trespass grow sites threaten to undo millions of dollars of habit preservation efforts."
   
The solution, according to The Post and High Country News, is relatively simple: They say that once marijuana is legalized , these problems will likely go away, because there will be less environmentally harmful ways to grow pot.

The DEA's Fairbanks claimed that marijuana cultivation had resulted in behavioral changes for some animal species including rabbits, who had developed a taste for the pot and had lost their natural instinct to keep away from people.

The Post, however, did not directly address this subject. Instead, it took a more light-hearted view, joking that "the occasional high rabbit" was no reason to enforce marijuana prohibition.

© 2017 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

 
1Like our page
2Share
US
The Utah Senate this week is scheduled to debate legislation permitting patients with some debilitating conditions to be "treated with certain edible forms of marijuana," The Washington Post's Wonkblog reported Monday.
Utah, edible pot, environmental impact
330
2015-26-02
Monday, 02 Mar 2015 03:26 PM
Newsmax Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved