Tags: Polls | report | newlyweds | race | ethnicity

Pew: 17% of Newlyweds Married to Someone of Different Race, Ethnicity

Image: Pew: 17&#37 of Newlyweds Married to Someone of Different Race, Ethnicity
(AP)

By Jeffrey Rodack   |   Thursday, 18 May 2017 03:04 PM

Seventeen percent of all U.S. newlyweds had a spouse of a different race or ethnicity, a new Pew Research Center analysis reveals.

Pew had analyzed figures from the U.S. Census Bureau and found that 2015 showed a fivefold increase of spouses of different races or ethnicities over 1967.

"In that year, the U.S. Supreme Court in the Loving v. Virginia case ruled that marriage across racial lines was legal throughout the country," Pew's Gretchen Livingston and Anna Brown wrote.

"Until this ruling, interracial marriages were forbidden in many states."

And the figures also reveal that 10 percent of all married people — in 2015 had a spouse of a different race or ethnicity.

"The most dramatic increases in intermarriage have occurred among black newlyweds," Livingston and Brown wrote. "Since 1980, the share who married someone of a different race or ethnicity has more than tripled from 5 percent to 18 percent.

"White newlyweds, too, have experienced a rapid increase in intermarriage, with rates rising from 4 percent to 11 percent. However, despite this increase, they remain the least likely of all major racial or ethnic groups to marry someone of a different race or ethnicity."

Here are some of the key findings in Pew's analysis:

  • The most common or ethnic pairing among newlywed intermarried couples is one Hispanic and one white spouse (42 percent).
  • The next most common pairing is one white and one Asian spouse (15 percent).
  • Newlyweds in metropolitan areas are more likely to be intermarried than those living outside those regions (18-11 percent).
  • Intermarriage is most common among newlyweds in their 30s (18 percent).
  • 28 percent or Republican and Republican-leaning independents say the increasing number of people of different races marrying each other is a good thing, while 49 percent of Democrats and independents who lean to the Democratic Party agree.

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Seventeen percent of all U.S. newlyweds had a spouse of a different race or ethnicity, a new Pew Research Center analysis reveals.
report, newlyweds, race, ethnicity
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2017-04-18
 

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