Tags: Polls | pew | study | telephone | internet | polls

Pew Study: Difference Between Phone, Internet Polls 'Not Large'

By    |   Friday, 15 May 2015 05:47 PM

A new study that tries to determine which polling method is best – by phone or online – finds there isn't much difference, though online surveys can sometimes be more accurate.

"The study finds that differences in responses by survey mode are fairly common, but typically not large," according to Pew Research Center, which conducted the query.

The researchers said the study had a mean difference of 5.5 percentage points and a median difference of 5 points across 60 questions.

"There is no way to determine whether the telephone or the Web responses are more accurate, though previous research examining questions for which the true value is known have found that self-administered surveys generally elicit more accurate information than interviewer-administered surveys," the Pew researchers concluded.

Among the areas that showed big differences between polling methods, Pew Research found that:
  • Differences were "especially large" on questions asking for an assessment of the quality of a person's family and social life, with phone respondents "reporting higher levels of satisfaction than those who completed the survey on the Web."
  • Differences were also large on questions about discrimination, "with telephone respondents more apt than Web respondents to say that gays and lesbians, Hispanics and blacks face a lot of discrimination," Pew Research found.
  • Online poll takers were far more likely than telephone respondents to give various political figures a "very unfavorable" rating – but telephone respondents were more likely than Web interviewees to say they often talked with their neighbors, say their communities are "excellent" places to live, and that their own health is "excellent."
  • Online respondents were more likely than phone respondents to report being unable to afford food or needed medical care at some point in the past 12 months.
"Despite these sometimes substantial differences, the study found that many commonly used survey questions evidence no mode effect," Pew Research found.

"And most questions about religious affiliation, belief and practice yielded similar results on the Web and on the phone, though Web respondents were somewhat more likely than those interviewed on the telephone to say that they 'seldom' or 'never' attended religious services," Pew Research reports.

The findings were heralded by one of the country's online polling champions, John Zogby of Zogby Analytics, the Washington Examiner reports.

"By 2004 we were ready to try using the Internet for our polling — alongside the traditional telephone methods from our call center," he told the Examiner in a statement.

"We nailed the presidential race nationally within 1 point and got 16 out of 20 states right."

"Though we have always had plenty of support from our clients, it is good to know that, the value of online surveys has been universally recognized, if belatedly."

© 2017 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

 
1Like our page
2Share
US
A new study that tries to determine which polling method is best – by phone or online – finds there isn't much difference, though online surveys can sometimes be more accurate.
pew, study, telephone, internet, polls
449
2015-47-15
Friday, 15 May 2015 05:47 PM
Newsmax Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved