Tags: Illegal Immigration | illegal juveniles | Jim Avila border crossing

ABC's Avila Says $5 Got Him Over Guatemalan Border

By    |   Monday, 08 Sep 2014 01:40 PM


It's not that difficult to cross into Mexico's southern border from Guatemala, claims ABC News reporter Jim Avila: For $5, he was able to board a raft and make a short trip across a river, along with three other people.

"We found in Guatemala just last month makeshift rafts, filled with immigrants crossing illegally into Mexico heading to the U.S.," Avila said during a segment on ABC's "This Week" Sunday. "I boarded one with no papers, no IDs checked. Cost me $5 to bring three people over here from Guatemala to Mexico."

As nearly 75 percent of the nearly 63,000 illegal, unaccompanied migrant juveniles that have come across the United States' southern border have been from Central America, there has been concern that many are traveling through Guatemala on their way north. Others pass through Belize into Mexico, and then into the United States, ABC reports.

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Mexico issues regional visitor permits to allow Guatemalans to come into their country without presenting a passport, reports Breitbart. Once they've crossed into Mexico, Guatemalans may stay for up to three days in the border towns, allowing plenty of time for them to board trains and head 1,000 miles north to the United States border.

However, in recent weeks, Mexico has been pulling migrants off the trains, reports Breitbart, in hopes of deterring illegals from using them.

As of last month, Mexico had deported more than 13,000 unaccompanied minors, while the United States has not deported any.

That figure represents 93 percent of the 14,000 undocumented children had who entered
Mexico illegally from Central American countries. Mexico also booted more than 64,000 of 69,000 adults who were seized this year at its southern border.

The United States, on the other hand, has detained 60,000 Central American minors this year, mainly from El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras, without deporting any of them.

According to Mexican government sources, most of the unaccompanied minors are age
12-17, and most are boys. They are sent home to their Central American countries by plane, while those who are accompanied by adult family members are given bus tickets back home.


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It's not that difficult to cross into Mexico's southern border from Guatemala, claims ABC News reporter Jim Avila: For $5, he was able to board a raft and make a short trip across a river, along with three other people.
Illegal Immigration, illegal juveniles, Jim Avila border crossing
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2014-40-08
Monday, 08 Sep 2014 01:40 PM
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