Tags: Immigration | Illegal | Immigrants | Asylum

Illegal Immigrants Face Higher Asylum Bar

By    |   Monday, 29 Sep 2014 08:12 AM

Illegal immigrants who are seeking asylum in the U.S. are facing tougher standards requiring them to prove that because they belong to a particular social, racial, or religious group they feel threatened in their country of origin, The Wall Street Journal reported.

Between 2010 and 2013 some 80 percent of all illegal aliens claimed they had a "credible-fear" for their future should they be sent home.

Under tighter criteria put in place by the Asylum Division of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services individuals who arrived in the country illegally are now less likely to be regarded as eligible for haven.

Applicants must meet a "credible fear" criterion. Some 36,334 credible-fear claims were processed by the Asylum Division from October to June mostly from citizens of El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras. In July, 63 percent were successful in convincing authorities that they faced persecution if they went back compared to 83 percent a half-year earlier.

Those who make it through the vetting process must go to immigration court — a process that can take years — while those rejected are supposed to be promptly sent home. Less than half of Central Americans who go before a judge are granted asylum, the Journal reported.

Unaccompanied children from Central America do not have to establish "credible fear" but automatically go before an immigration judge, according to the Journal.

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte of Virginia believes the stricter Asylum Division standards need to be further tightened. A bill he introduced would make it harder for authorities to release asylum seekers while their claims are being evaluated. "The Obama administration must take additional steps to ensure credible fear claims are not rubber-stamped," he said, the Journal reported.

Advocates for the migrants say the new rules are too stringent. "It's turning away people who may very well have been entitled to asylum protection," said Eleanor Acer of Human Rights First, according to the Journal.

© 2017 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

 
1Like our page
2Share
US
Illegal immigrants who are seeking asylum in the U.S. are facing tougher standards requiring them to prove that because they belong to a particular social, racial, or religious group they feel threatened in their country of origin, The Wall Street Journal reported.
Illegal, Immigrants, Asylum
319
2014-12-29
Monday, 29 Sep 2014 08:12 AM
Newsmax Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved