House Republicans Challenge Energy Secretary on Climate Change

Image: House Republicans Challenge Energy Secretary on Climate Change

Wednesday, 19 Jun 2013 04:19 PM

By Dan Weil

Share:
  Comment  |
   Contact Us  |
  Print  
|  A   A  
  Copy Shortlink
Republicans on the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology took issue with Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz over climate change at a hearing Tuesday, telling the former MIT physicist that many elements of climate science are open to question.

Several Republicans quizzed Moniz as to how much climate change stems from human activity, as opposed to natural fluctuation.

“Is there any way to estimate what percent? Is it 50 percent, 90 percent of human activities?” Committee Chairman Lamar Smith, a Texas Republican asked, according to Politico.

Moniz said he doesn't know the precise percentage.

"In my scientific view, what we are seeing is consistent with being driven by manmade activities," he said. "Basically, my statement is based on the fact that if one simply looks at what one knows and one has known for over a century about how CO2 [carbon dioxide] in particular drives global warming through the greenhouse effect."

Moniz said it is known how much carbon dioxide we emit from combustion and how much carbon dioxide is gathering in the atmosphere, he said. "We know the time trajectory of those."

The debate indicates the Obama administration will have a tough time gaining GOP support for its climate change plan, which is expected to be announced next month, according to Politico.

Republican Rep. Dana Rohrabacher of California brought up Moniz' resume, while suggesting other experts have differing views, Politico reports.

"You're from MIT, and I appreciate I'm from Long Beach State," the congressman said. "But there are other people with credentials, like Richard Lindzen from MIT, who are very skeptical of some of the research that has been going on." Lindzen is one of the leading climate science skeptics.

Meanwhile, a recent Australian study determined that the increase of atmospheric carbon dioxide is helping plant growth in arid deserts, USA Today reports.

Randall Donohue, of the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, found that climate change helped spark an 11 percent increase in plant growth in the U.S. Southwest, the Middle East, parts of Africa, and the Australian Outback.

"If elevated CO2 causes the water use of individual leaves to drop, plants will respond by increasing their total numbers of leaves," Donohue said, according to USA Today.


© 2014 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

Share:
  Comment  |
   Contact Us  |
  Print  
  Copy Shortlink
Around the Web
Join the Newsmax Community
Please review Community Guidelines before posting a comment.
>> Register to share your comments with the community.
>> Login if you are already a member.
blog comments powered by Disqus
 
Email:
Retype Email:
Country
Zip Code:
 
Hot Topics
Follow Newsmax
Like us
on Facebook
Follow us
on Twitter
Add us
on Google Plus
Around the Web
You May Also Like

IRS Union PAC Gave 94 Percent of Donations to Democrats

Wednesday, 30 Jul 2014 12:10 PM

The PAC that is an extension of the union representing Internal Revenue Service employees donated 94 percent of its tota . . .

Patent Office Workers Paid to Exercise, Do Laundry, Shop Online

Wednesday, 30 Jul 2014 11:35 AM

Paralegals hired by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office to handle a backlog of appeals and cases were actually paid mor . . .

Microsoft Fighting US Government Over Consumer Email Privacy

Wednesday, 30 Jul 2014 11:31 AM

Computer giant Microsoft is taking on the U.S. government in a battle to protect the privacy of cellphone and computer u . . .

Most Commented

Newsmax, Moneynews, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, NewsmaxWorld, NewsmaxHealth, are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

 
NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
©  Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved