Tags: Marijuana Legalization | federal laws | state laws | marijuana

Govt Employers Still Frown on Marijuana Use, Even if Legal

Image: Govt Employers Still Frown on Marijuana Use, Even if Legal
(Wollertz/Dreamstime)

By    |   Monday, 29 Jun 2015 01:40 PM

Marijuana use may be legal in a growing number of states but residents of those places should be aware that partaking could keep them from being hired by the federal government, according to The New York Times.

The standards vary by agency with law enforcement positions being the strictest, according to the Times. The Environmental Protection Agency requires pre-employment drug-testing, for example, but other agencies, including the State Department and the National Park Service, do not.

The CIA requires job candidates be "generally" drug free for at least a year, the Times reports, and inquires about potential hires' past use, while the FBI requires that recruits not use marijuana for at least three years before they are hired.

"Drug involvement can raise questions about an individual's reliability, judgment and trustworthiness or ability or willingness to comply with laws, rules and regulations," according to a government-wide memo penned last May by Katherine Archuleta, director of the Office of Personnel Management.

Archuleta's memo reminded federal employees that regardless of state laws that have decriminalized pot, "federal law on marijuana use remains unchanged."

Recreational marijuana became legal in Colorado on Jan. 1 to anyone age 21 and over, but since then, employment drug testing in the Rocky Mountain State has increased, according to The Washington Post, which reports that companies are concerned "that the state's burgeoning pot industry might start to infiltrate the workplace."

In April, The Guardian reported that more than one in five companies were going to make their drug-testing policies "more stringent" after recreational marijuana became legal in Colorado. Those same employers plan to hand out "harsher consequences for positive drug tests."

In 2014, the number of workers who tested positive for drug use increased for the first time since 2003, according to the Post, citing data from Quest Diagnostics, which performed 8.4 million tests last year.

According to the Department of Labor, drug and alcohol use accounted for some $82 billion in lost productivity in the year studied, while a different study, published by the Department of Health and Human Services, found that nearly 10 percent of adults working full-time use drugs, "a number that is increasing, likely driven by marijuana use," according to The Guardian.

Related Stories:

© 2017 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

 
1Like our page
2Share
US
Marijuana use may be legal in a growing number of states but residents of those places should be aware that partaking could keep them from being hired by the federal government, according to The New York Times.
federal laws, state laws, marijuana
392
2015-40-29
Monday, 29 Jun 2015 01:40 PM
Newsmax Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved