Tags: education | standards | testing | funding

GOP Lawmakers to Rework 'No Child Left Behind' School Act

By    |   Friday, 02 Jan 2015 07:56 AM

Republican leadership is in the throes of rewriting the controversial No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, which authorizes federal spending on programs to support K-12 schooling, Politico reports.

NCLB – which mandates annual testing of students in third through eighth grades, and once during high school, in reading and math — passed with sweeping bipartisan support but has since been reviled by many parents and lawmakers on both sides of the aisle.

While it does not set a national achievement standard like the Common Core initiative, letting each state develop its own standards, NCLB requires states to give assessment tests in order to receive federal school funding.

Some parents feel the law’s provisions amount to nothing more than "teaching to the test," while many Democrats accuse the law of labeling failing schools but doing nothing to fix the problem. And Republicans dislike NCLB because of its "aggressive federal overreach" according to Politico.

President Barack Obama has helped dilute the law by waiving some key provisions, a move that has upset many state leaders, who feel that doing so has helped bolster the Common Core Standards Initiative that sets strict benchmarks for what K-12 students need to have mastered in English language arts and mathematics at the end of each grade.

Tennessee Sen. Lamar Alexander, the incoming Senate education committee chairman, and his House counterpart, Rep. John Kline of Minnesota, are in overdrive to make changes to the law. Alexander, according to Politico, has been meeting with lawmakers from both parties to rewrite a bill he wants to have on Obama’s desk before summer, according to Politico.

The most fractious issue, Politico reports, is "when and how to test students, how to punish low-performing schools — if at all — and what the law should do to promote good teaching."

Scaling back or eliminating the "adequate yearly progress" requirement that severely sanctions schools that aren’t "quickly progressing towards universal proficiency" would be a good starting point, according to The Daily Caller, since there is near unanimity that that part of the law is "broken."

© 2017 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

 
1Like our page
2Share
US
Republican leadership is in the throes of rewriting the controversial No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, which authorizes federal spending on programs to support K-12 schooling, Politico reports.
education, standards, testing, funding
342
2015-56-02
Friday, 02 Jan 2015 07:56 AM
Newsmax Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved