Tags: Homeland Security | Disney | planes | advertising | banners

Ad Banner Planes Still Kept Out of Disney Airspace

By    |   Monday, 10 Nov 2014 05:43 PM

Planes with advertising banners that buzz crowds and events must steer clear of Disney theme parks in Florida and California — a protective bubble created by Congress after 9/11 that endures despite a lack of comparable no-fly zones for major urban centers and other theme parks, the Los Angeles Times reports.

Disneyland in Anaheim and Disney World in Orlando got the "national defense airspace" designation in 2003, along with major sporting events, under a spending bill passed weeks before the Iraq war, despite no apparent call for it by defense and counter-terrorism officials, the Times reports.

Instead, a Disney lobbyist made the request, the Times reports, citing a 2003 investigation by the Orlando Sentinel newspaper.

Passage of the spending measure effectively cleared the skies over two Magic Kingdoms of all flying banners and other airborne attention-grabbers.

Nearly 100 aerial advertising firms went out of business afterward, said the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association.

Critics of the Disney bans told the Times they serve no defensible national security or safety purpose.

A Disney spokeswoman countered that "airspace restrictions over large gathering places like sports stadiums and our theme parks continue to make sense for enhancing public safety."

Guest safety wasn't the only priority, however, when Disney won the restrictions. A Disney official told the Orlando Sentinel in 2003 that "banner ads from trial lawyers" were a flying nuisance.

The Times reports that Disney's no-fly zones are classified as temporary — in the same category as airspace prohibitions that accompany major sporting events and Air Force One's flight path on presidential business.

"Yet there is nothing temporary about the restrictions over the Disney properties," the Times reports, adding, "Such limits do not exist over competing theme parks such as Universal Studios [Orlando] or Knott's Berry Farm [in California]."

A legal challenge in 2003 by a Christian group, the Family Policy Network, failed to lift the 3-mile zone of exclusion. The group had wanted to fly a banner reading, "Jesus Christ: Hopeforhomosexuals.com," over Disney World during one of the Orlando park's annual Gay Day celebrations.

A lawyer who represented the Family Policy Network told the Times, "I would say, today, that the case for protecting Disney is even weaker than it was when we argued those cases."

© 2017 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

 
1Like our page
2Share
US
Planes with advertising banners that buzz crowds and events must steer clear of Disney theme parks in Florida and California — a protective bubble created by Congress after 9/11 that endures despite a lack of comparable no-fly zones for . . .
Disney, planes, advertising, banners
372
2014-43-10
Monday, 10 Nov 2014 05:43 PM
Newsmax Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved