Tags: CIA | torture | techniques | Army

CIA Still Allowed to Use Questionable Techniques

By    |   Friday, 12 Dec 2014 06:09 PM

Even though the CIA has been kept on a tight leash in the interrogation techniques it has been allowed to use for the past five years, the techniques still permitted count as torture, according to the U.N. and human rights groups.

The National Journal reports that an Army field manual instructing interrogators on what techniques can be used to wring information out of prisoners still contains 18 specific techniques, such as force-feeding and isolation, which groups like Amnesty International insist are unacceptable.

Today, interrogators, whether military or intelligence agencies, are required to adhere to techniques spelled out in the Army's FM-2-22.3 "Human Intelligence Collector Operations" manual, which was to be the original guidebook for interrogations on military bases until the CIA initiated its program of covert "black site" prisons, where torturous interrogation techniques came into play, The New York Times reports.

The manual prohibits any "cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment" such as waterboarding, hooding prisoners, beating them, threatening them with military dogs, forced sexual acts, humiliation or even threatening or coercive behavior, including warning prisoners that they could be turned over to other interrogators where brutality would be likely.

In apparent agreement with the findings of the recently released Senate report on CIA interrogation techniques, the manual states "Use of torture is not only illegal but also it is a poor technique that yields unreliable results, may damage subsequent collection efforts and can induce the source to say what he thinks the [interrogator] wants to hear."

However, Appendix M added to the manual by the Bush administration in 2006, mandates that prisoners may be allowed only four hours of sleep in every 24 hours, and may be separated from other prisoners to "foster a feeling of futility," the National Journal notes.

"But the methods the CIA is still allowed to use continue to give critics fodder for questioning Obama's claim that he outlawed torture in the U.S.," the National Journal writes.

Under the military manual's specifications, detainees are to be kept silent to prevent them "from relieving the stress and shock of capture by talking with others" and may be separated from other detainees.

Throughout, the manual stresses that captured detainees are to be treated in accordance with the Geneva Convention. Interrogators may not pose as medical personnel, clergy, Red Cross representatives or journalists. The manual stresses, "Detainees are treated humanely but with firmness at all times. The mistreatment or abuse of detainees is a violation of the UCMJ [Uniform Code of Military Justice] for which violators may be punished."

As a guideline to military interrogators as to whether interrogation techniques can be considered torture, the manual states they should ask themselves "If the proposed approach technique were used by the enemy against one of your fellow soldiers, would you believe the soldier had been abused?" and "Could your conduct in carrying out the proposed technique violate a law or regulation?" the National Journal reports.

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Even though the CIA has been kept on a tight leash in the interrogation techniques it has been allowed to use for the past five years, the techniques still permitted count as torture, according to the U.N. and human rights groups.
CIA, torture, techniques, Army
485
2014-09-12
Friday, 12 Dec 2014 06:09 PM
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