Tags: us | airmen | killed | 1952 | alaska | crash

17 US Airmen Killed in 1952 Alaska Crash Recovered and ID'd

Image: 17 US Airmen Killed in 1952 Alaska Crash Recovered and ID'd
In this 2012 file photo, aerial view from an Alaska Army National Guard UH-60L Black Hawk helicopter of Colony Glacier, foreground, as it flows towards Inner Lake George and Knik Glacier in the distance.

By    |   Thursday, 19 Jun 2014 09:44 AM

Melting snows uncovered the remains of 17 of the 52 U.S. service members who died in a crash outside Anchorage in 1952 and they have now been recovered and identified.

The crash site was rediscovered two years ago, and testing has confirmed the identities.

The Department of Defense on Wednesday said the remains of the 17 service members killed in the crash of the C-124A Globemaster will be returned to their families for burial with full military honors.

Urgent: Do You Approve Or Disapprove of President Obama's Job Performance? Vote Now in Urgent Poll

The plane crashed while en route to Elmendorf Air Force Base, Alaska, from McChord Air Force Base, Washington. 
The wreckage was spotted soon after the heavy transport plane vanished Nov. 22, 1952, with 41 passengers and 11 crew members onboard, but it became buried in snow.

The Alaska National Guard discovered the wreckage in June 2012 on Colony Glacier, about 40 miles east of Anchorage.

The remaining 35 service members have not yet been recovered.

The Department of Defense has released names and ranks for the service members, but not hometowns. Identified by military branch were:

U.S. Army: Lt. Col. Lawrence S. Singleton, Pvt. James Green Jr., and Pvt. Leonard A. Kittle

U.S. Marine Corps: Maj. Earl J. Stearns

U.S. Navy: Cmdr. Albert J. Seeboth

U.S. Air Force: Col. Noel E. Hoblit, Col. Eugene Smith, Capt. Robert W. Turnbull, 1st Lt. Donald Sheda, 1st Lt. William L. Turner, Tech. Sgt. Engolf W. Hagen, Staff Sgt. James H. Ray, Airman 1st Class Marion E. Hooton, Airman 2nd Class Carroll R. Dyer, Airman 2nd Class Thomas S. Lyons, Airman 2nd Class Thomas C. Thigpen, and Airman 3rd Class Howard E. Martin

Urgent: Assess Your Heart Attack Risk in Minutes. Click Here.

© 2017 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

 
1Like our page
2Share
TheWire
Melting snows uncovered the remains of 17 of the 52 U.S. service members who died in a crash outside Anchorage in 1952 and they have now been recovered and identified.
us, airmen, killed, 1952, alaska, crash
293
2014-44-19
Thursday, 19 Jun 2014 09:44 AM
Newsmax Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved