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Hawaii Lava Flow Update: First Home, Storage Shed Destroyed

Image: Hawaii Lava Flow Update: First Home, Storage Shed Destroyed
An aerial view shows lava from Kilauea Volcano starting to consume the first house in Pahoa, Hawaii, November 10, 2014. (Bruce Omori/Paradise Helicopters/EPA/Landov)

By    |   Tuesday, 11 Nov 2014 06:40 AM

The tenacious Hawaiian lava flow on the state's Big Island claimed its first house on Monday, as civil defense officials reported that it burned the structure valued at about $200,000 in the village of Pahoa.

Officials told the newspaper that the lava flow remained about 22 yards from a closed refuse transfer station and 480 feet from Pahoa Village Road. The lava is moving at a rate of about three to five yards an hour, according to the Honolulu Star-Advertiser.

The owners of the destroyed home left June 27 when the lava flow began approaching the subdivision, Hawaii County civil defense administrator Darryl Oliveira told West Hawaii Today. Oliveira said they moved to the mainland to escape the advancing lava.

"We did have family members onsite to document as well as to observe the loss of this long-standing property that many generations have shared in," said Oliveira.

The flow also burned through a small corrugated steel garden shed located on the southeastern edge of the property.

"It's slow," Imelda Raras told the newspaper, but she said she has already moved her family's belongings to storage in case it gets closer to her home. "Maybe there will come a time when it will be faster again."

Donalyn Dela Cruz, a spokeswoman for the Hawaii Department of Education, told the Star-Advertiser that the agency began moving 400 students at a school projected to be in the path of the lava flow into portable classrooms set up in the parking lot.

"Parents expressed relief and were pleased with the arrangements of the classrooms," said Dela Cruz. "Many high school students were helpful with the younger students."

The Star-Advertiser reported that schools in the area were closed last month to prepare for the transfer of about 1,700 students and 300 employees to other schools on their side of the lava's projected path.

Lava has flowed from a vent in the Kilauea volcano since June, sending a long stretch of slow-moving lava into the island since then, threatening a small town in its path, according to USA Today.


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The tenacious Hawaiian lava flow on the state's Big Island claimed its first house on Monday, as civil defense officials reported that it burned the structure valued at about $200,000 in the village of Pahoa.
hawaii, lava, flow, update
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2014-40-11
Tuesday, 11 Nov 2014 06:40 AM
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