Tags: glacier bay | landslide | alaska

Glacier Bay Landslide in Alaska Sends 100 Million Tons of Earth Tumbling

Image: Glacier Bay Landslide in Alaska Sends 100 Million Tons of Earth Tumbling
(Twitter/@GlacierBayNPS)

By    |   Tuesday, 05 Jul 2016 02:56 PM

A Glacier Bay landslide on June 28 sent more than 100 million tons or rock roaring down a mountainside at the national park, located in Southeast Alaska near Juneau.

The Alaska Dispatch News reported that researchers have been studying the landslide since the 4,000-foot high mountainside collapsed around 8:21 a.m. last week. The rock face fell apart on a steep slope as debris tumbled down the mountain, slamming against ice on Lamplugh Glacier, said Colin Stark, a geophysicist at Columbia University.

"It rivals anything we've had in several years," Stark said Saturday.

The landslide, which was estimated to be about six miles long, had the force of 280 giganewtons, leading Stark to call it a "world class" landslide, according to KHNS radio.

"I'm not very good on the real-world things, I'm an academic, what do I know? But [think of] 100 million cars falling down a slope…" Stark told KHNS.

Russ White, a geologist from Haines, Alaska, said that while the landslide was "pretty spectacular," it happens every two to four years.

"Mountains are eroding constantly, and this is just one of the forms of erosion," White said. "It's a fairly spectacular form of erosion when a 4,000-foot face of a mountain falls off and shoots itself six miles out across the glacier. That's pretty spectacular."

But according to the Alaska Earthquake Center, the June 28 landslide was "much bigger than anything in the recent past," wrote KHNS.

Michael West, an Alaska state seismologist and director of the Alaska Earthquake Center at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, told the radio station that the vibrations from the slide were picked up in Barrow and Nome.

"[The landslide] shook a decent amount of our planet," West told KHNS.

West also told the Dispatch News that the slide was equivalent to about a magnitude-5.5 earthquake.

© 2017 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

 
1Like our page
2Share
TheWire
A Glacier Bay landslide on June 28 sent more than 100 million tons or rock roaring down a mountainside at the national park, located in Southeast Alaska near Juneau.
glacier bay, landslide, alaska
303
2016-56-05
Tuesday, 05 Jul 2016 02:56 PM
Newsmax Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved