Tags: flu | shot | pneumonia | jama

Flu Shot, Pneumonia Piggyback Protection Seen in JAMA Study

Image: Flu Shot, Pneumonia Piggyback Protection Seen in JAMA Study
A nurse administers a flu shot at a New York City hospital.  (Andrew Kelly/Reuters)

By    |   Wednesday, 07 Oct 2015 08:21 AM

Your annual flu shot can not only help stave off influenza, it also reduces the chances of catching pneumonia, suggests a new study in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

In the JAMA study released on Monday, and funded by the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, researchers found that patients with flu-associated pneumonia were less likely to have received the flu vaccine.

"The authors note that the estimated odds ratio of vaccination between cases and controls, and derived vaccine effectiveness from this study, could be used to inform subsequent estimations of the national number of hospitalizations for pneumonia averted by influenza vaccination,"  JAMA said in a statement about the flu shot study.

While getting the flu shot may improve the patient's odds against pneumonia, it remained unclear if the vaccines can decrease the risk of flu-related hospitalizations.

Medical News Today said the study's authors noted that the small pool of flu-associated pneumonia cases it examined resulted in limited data for some subgroups.

The flu is responsible for roughly 226,000 hospitalizations annually, according to JAMA, and pneumonia -- a common complication of influenza -- is the leading infectious cause of hospitalization and death in the United States.

The flu is a contagious respiratory illness caused by viruses that infect the nose, throat and lungs, says the CDC, and can cause mild to severe illness, but can also lead to death. The medical community suggests that the public get annual flu vaccines which vary in effectiveness from year to year.

Many disease experts believe the flu is spread mostly by droplets from people with flu when they cough, sneeze or talk, noted the CDC. The droplets of an infected person can land in the mouths or noses of people who are in close proximity.

A smaller chance of transmitting the flu comes when a person touches a surface or object that has flu virus on it and then touches their own mouth, eyes or possibly their nose, said the CDC. Some of the flu's symptoms includes a fever, cough, sore throat, runny, nose, muscle aches, headaches and fatigue.


Related Stories:

© 2017 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

 
1Like our page
2Share
TheWire
Your annual flu shot can not only help stave off influenza, it also reduces the chances of catching pneumonia, suggests a new study in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
flu, shot, pneumonia, jama
382
2015-21-07
Wednesday, 07 Oct 2015 08:21 AM
Newsmax Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved