Tags: european space agency | map | milky way

European Space Agency Map: First Data for Milky Way Chart Released

Image: European Space Agency Map: First Data for Milky Way Chart Released

The European Space Agency has released the first data from its ongoing effort, called the Gaia Mission, to draw the biggest and most precise 3-D map of our galaxy. Here, a man walks in front of a slide show depicting a representation of the ESA Gaia Project at the ESA center in Villanueva de la Canada, near Madrid, Spain, Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2016. (AP Photo/Daniel Ochoa de Olza)

By    |   Thursday, 15 Sep 2016 05:35 PM

On Wednesday, the European Space Agency released the first data for the most detailed map to date of the Milky Way.

When the 3-D map is complete, about 1 billion out of the estimated 100 billion stars in the Milky Way will be charted as to their position and brightness. More than 2 million stars also will have their distances and motions across the sky calculated, according to the International Business Times.

The map was made using observations from the Gaia space observatory between July 2013 and September 2015.

“Gaia is at the forefront of astrometry, charting the sky at precisions that have never been achieved before,” said ESA Director of Science Alvaro Gimenez in a statement on the European Space Agency's website

Gaia can observe stars up to 30,000 light years away, a much greater distance than previous satellites and telescopes.

Four more data releases are planned through 2022, says National Geographic. The data will show more than 400 million stars that have never been seen before.

“It’s the largest-ever map made [of the Milky Way] from a single survey, and it’s also the most accurate map ever made,” Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium member Anthony Brown said, according to National Geographic.

The current map pinpoints a star’s location to within 10 milliarcseconds, which equates to a hair’s breadth from more than a mile away.

University College of Dublin scientist Michael Perryman told National Geographic, “It’s very unusual, very revolutionary, and very spectacular — and it’s going to keep thousands of scientists busy for years.”

Gaia’s billion-pixel camera also can capture solar system objects other than stars, so the map will contain distant galaxies, quasars, and exoplanets, lead project scientist Timo Prusti told National Geographic.

Columbia University astronomer Kathryn Johnston told National Geographic Gaia is “the data set for galactic science for my generation of astronomers.”

© 2017 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

 
1Like our page
2Share
TheWire
On Wednesday, the European Space Agency released the first data for the most detailed map to date of the Milky Way. When the 3-D map is complete, about 1 billion out of the estimated 100 billion stars in the Milky Way will be charted as to their position and brightness.
european space agency, map, milky way
311
2016-35-15
Thursday, 15 Sep 2016 05:35 PM
Newsmax Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved