Tags: cicada | northeast | 17-year | reunion

Cicada Buzz: Northeast's 17-Year Reunion Set for This Spring

Image: Cicada Buzz: Northeast's 17-Year Reunion Set for This Spring

Cicada taking a 17-year nap. (Instagram@clevemetroparks)

By    |   Monday, 18 Apr 2016 08:56 AM

Cicadas are expected to make a noisy 17-year return this spring by the "trillions" after many, many of the insects have been living underground since 1999.

Cicadas, probably best known for their buzzing and clicking noises, emerge after years to look for mates, reported National Geographic. The males use the humming or buzzing sound as a call to attract mates.

Not all cicadas follow the same schedule, so they can be seen and heard in other years.

Cicadas are expected to be especially seen in Ohio, Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia after last appearing 17 years ago, noted WBNS-TV. Those cicadas have emerged in 1948, 1965, and 1982 before their last appearance in 1999, stated the television station.

The cicadas, which have lived about eight inches beneath the ground, will start to rise when the ground reaches a temperature of 64 degrees, according to the website Cicadas Mania. The website said warm rains in May often spark the rise, but said the insects could come out as early as April.

"There will be trillions." Ohio State University professor Dave Sheltar told WBNS-TV. "A couple hundred thousand may be in a particular area. I'm predicting that in the southern part of (Ohio), we may be seeing cicadas emerging in the last part of April, but for middle Ohio and the northern part of Ohio it will still be primarily in May."

Russ Horton, an entomologist, told the Washington Post that after the male and female cicadas have mated, the female will lay fertilized eggs in slits cut with her ovipositor on small live twigs. Horton said it takes about six weeks for the eggs to hatch and the offspring, called nymphs, to emerge.

Sheltar said the nymphs will then fall from the trees and burrow into the ground where they will live off the juices from plant roots. He said the females can lay as many as 400 eggs across 40 to 50 sites.

"It's going to be a wild ride," Wendy Weirich, director of Outdoor Experiences for the Cleveland Metroparks, told the Cleveland Plain Dealer. "It's like Rip Van Winkle for insects."

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Cicadas are expected to make a noisy 17-year return this spring by the "trillions" after many, many of the insects have been living underground since 1999.
cicada, northeast, 17-year, reunion
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2016-56-18
Monday, 18 Apr 2016 08:56 AM
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