Tags: GM | Chevrolet | self-driving car | Shanghai

GM Touts Self-Driving Chevy-FNR as Car of the Future

By    |   Wednesday, 22 Apr 2015 04:31 PM

General Motors has unveiled its version of what is purported to be one of the top transportation wonders of the 21st century: the self-driving electric vehicle, made by Chevrolet.

Known formally as the Chevrolet-FNR, it was unveiled this week at a General Motors gala in Shanghai. According to the Daily Mail, the vehicle "boasts a futuristic capsule design among other interesting features."

Above is what might be described as the "glass half full" reaction. When a writer showed the Daily Mail's picture of the Chevrolet-FNR to his son, both agreed that at first glance it looked much more like a vehicle that had been involved in a serious accident with its driver's-side door almost completely torn off.

Clearly GM doesn't think that, however, and has launched an all-out effort to tout the vehicle as the car of the future.

It was developed in Shanghai by GM's Pan Asia Technical Automotive Center.

GM said the aim of the project was "to create a unique, intelligent vehicle for tomorrow's younger consumers by utilizing innovative car networking technology." The company says it will be possible for someone to turn on the car using only his eyes.

While the car is in "self-driving" mode, its front seats can swivel 180 degrees to face the rear seats, enabling the driver to talk to passengers.

Using what is described as a "gesture control feature," a driver can switch to manual control mode whenever he or she wants to do so.

Chevrolet describes the car as only a concept, and no production date has been announced. It is also unclear what the vehicle will cost.

Alan Batey, head of global Chevrolet, said the car "reaffirms Chevrolet's commitment to offer electric vehicles that meet customers' lifestyles and are within their reach."

A recent study by University of Michigan researchers offers a cautionary note, however: it found that many adults would engage in behavior that would increase travel sickness.

They asked more than 3,200 adults across the U.S., India, China, Japan, Great Britain and Australia what kinds of activities they would do instead of driving in a fully self-driving vehicle.

More than a third of Americans said they would do things that increase the likelihood and severity of motion sickness, including reading, texting, watching movies or television, playing games or working.

More than half of Indians and 40 percent of Chinese responded that they also would  engage in those kinds of activities.

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General Motors has unveiled its version of what is purported to be one of the top transportation wonders of the 21st century: the self-driving electric vehicle, made by Chevrolet.
GM, Chevrolet, self-driving car, Shanghai
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2015-31-22
Wednesday, 22 Apr 2015 04:31 PM
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