Tags: | war on women | Democrats | midterms

Midterm Lesson for Dems: 'War on Women' Didn't Work

By    |   Tuesday, 11 Nov 2014 01:54 PM

The "War On Women" (WOW) is officially over and the Democrats lost.

In race after race, Democrats seeking to hammer Republicans with "women's issues" such as birth control and abortion found to their election outcome dismay that women, just like men, were more concerned with other issues — economics, security and leadership — allowing Republicans to make significant inroads into the female voter base, traditionally a Democratic stronghold.

Fortune reported, "The Republican Party’s demographic problems are far from over. This was a low-turnout election mostly populated by white, older voters. In 2016, the GOP still needs to make inroads with Hispanics, younger voters and women.

"But this week’s election results show it’s not a lost cause."

Consider blue state Maryland, where Republican gubernatorial candidate Larry Hogan was down in virtually every poll in his race against Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, who was eviscerating Hogan with claims that he would ban abortion and birth control, The Washington Post reported.

Brown struck back with an endorsement from his daughter, Jaymi Sterling, who said, "Let me tell you about my dad, Larry Hogan. He married my mom and became the father of three independent, strong young women.

"These ads attacking him as anti-women are just wrong. He's the only candidate who favors over-the-counter birth control, covered by insurance. He’s committed to not changing current Maryland law on choice."

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Hogan won by roughly 77,000 votes, the Huffington Post reported. 

The Washington Post commented, "The 'gender gap' did not turn out to be the potent force that Democrats had hoped it would be in Maryland and across the nation."

In Colorado, Democratic Sen. Mark Udall pushed the WOW factor so hard that locals began referring to him as Mark Uterus, Fortune noted, but in the end, Republican Rep. Cory Gardner won.

In Texas, liberal darling Sen. Wendy Davis, who gained fame in an 11-hour filibuster last year against Texas restrictions on abortion clinics, went down in flames in her gubernatorial race against Republican Greg Abbott, who also won 54 percent of Texas female voters, the Austin American-Statesman noted.

"I think the important lesson for Democrats is that all of those women's issues, especially the reproductive rights issues, have to be embedded in a larger message about women's economic empowerment," political commentator Mara Liasson told NPR.

"This election was also a stark reminder that women voters don’t care only about health issues. Reproductive rights don’t rank high on the list of female voter priorities, especially at a time when wages are stagnating and ISIS is beheading Americans," Fortune noted.

Politichicks' Morgan Brittany commented to WND, "'The war on women' is dead. It’s over. It was phony to begin with and it was a message that did not resonate with a large majority of American women."

Citing a Washington Post poll which found that while females still voted more for Democrats than Republicans, at 51-47 percent, married women favored Republicans over Democrats by 54-44 percent, she said, "The message was loud and clear. National security, the economy and healthcare trumped $10 birth control, abortion and pay inequality.

"Obviously the Democrat message was not enough to motivate liberal women to get out and vote, because they had heard it all before and the fear factor was gone.

"The Democrats failed because they insulted the intelligence of their own voters."

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The "War On Women" is officially over and the Democrats lost.
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2014-54-11
Tuesday, 11 Nov 2014 01:54 PM
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