Tags: Barack Obama | Mitt Romney | | Ohio | polls | Kasich | Portman

Kasich, Portman: The Polls Are Wrong

By    |   Sunday, 04 Nov 2012 12:09 AM

Ohio Gov. John Kasich and Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, said the small lead that many polls give President Barack Obama in The Buckeye State do not reflect what is really happening on the ground.

Kasich questioned whether pollsters were overestimating Democrat excitement to vote for Obama and he said that he has not seen so much enthusiasm for a Republican presidential candidate in the state since then President George W. Bush overwhelmingly won Ohio in 2004 by roughly 165,000 votes.

"I don't feel the kind of enthusiasm among Democrats that I see among Republicans," he said. "The turnout models that show a bigger Democrat turnout than what is likely to occur, that's why I think Romney is going to win. It's intensity."

Kasich and Portman made the statements today at a campaign stop with Romney, according to CNN.

The Real Clear Politics poll average, based on numbers from 11 separate polls of voters across the state, shows Obama with a 2.9 percent lead in the state, 49.3 to 46.4.

Ten polls show Obama with leads ranging from one to six points, while Rasmussen Reports called the race a tie.

GOP sources show the race much closer than most polls, and Romney has had a slight lead over the past several days, according to CNN.

"I am not worried about the public polls," Portman said.

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Ohio Gov. John Kasich and Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, said the small lead that many polls give President Barack Obama in The Buckeye State do not reflect what is really happening on the ground.
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Sunday, 04 Nov 2012 12:09 AM
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