Tags: | Trump Administration | Barack Obama | Hillary Clinton | Rand Paul | GOP | blue

GOP Makes Key Inroads in Blue, Purple States

By    |   Thursday, 06 Nov 2014 11:16 AM

Republican candidates on Tuesday were able to claim victories in blue and purple states initially thought to be locked up by Democrats, a sign that Democratic advantages were simply not enough to overcome the prevailing political mood, according to The New York Times.

The GOP scored unexpected victories in Colorado and North Carolina, and came close in Virginia even though both parties believed they would go to the Democrats. It was also expected that demographic shifts toward a more racially diverse and younger electorate would deliver dividends for Democrats, along with their long-held technological advantage in voter targeting and turn-out.

"Tuesday's results are causing leaders of both parties, and those with their eye on the White House, to re-examine their assumptions about the electoral map," the Times said.
The Democrats historic advantage among Hispanic voters was not enough to deliver victories for Democrats in Georgia and Texas, and the party's traditional advantage among female voters shrank or disappeared, the Times said.

The party will need to reconcile why it was unable to mobilize some of its strongest supporters, though one of the problems may be that a large majority of those who voted were white and over the age of 45.

Meanwhile, Republicans appeared to have closed the gap with Democrats in their technological advantages which formed the backbone of President Barack Obama's successful campaigns.

Should former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton decide to run, there will be a question about whether an increasingly diverse electorate will be enough to overcome any decline in enthusiasm among minority voters during Obama's tenure, the Times said.

Republicans, meanwhile, were buoyed by the gubernatorial wins in blue states and red states alike, but those victories may not translate into success in 2016, particularly if turnout is more diverse.

"There were a lot of people who didn't vote last night and will in 2016," South Carolina GOP Sen. Lindsey Graham told the Times. "Not to borrow from John Edwards, but there are two Americas — two American electorates. So I don't think we should have a false sense of confidence from last night."

Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul thinks one solution is to ensure Republicans make more efforts to develop support among minorities by championing issues that speak to them, including criminal justice and immigration reform. He said last month that he believes at least 30 percent of black voters could be drawn to the GOP if the party has an effective outreach effort.

"When you look at presidential politics, when we've tried to go safe, we've been sorry," Paul told the Times, referring both to the choice of candidates and where they have campaigned. "We need to break out of the demographic stranglehold we're in at this point."

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Republican candidates on Tuesday were able to claim victories in blue and purple states initially thought to be locked up by Democrats, a sign that Democratic advantages were simply not enough to overcome the prevailing political mood, according to The New York Times.
GOP, blue, purple, states, Rand Paul, Hillary Clinton
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2014-16-06
Thursday, 06 Nov 2014 11:16 AM
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