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'Draft Warren' Movement Grows, but Senator Still Says 'No'

Image: 'Draft Warren' Movement Grows, but Senator Still Says 'No'
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By    |   Tuesday, 10 Feb 2015 11:49 AM

So far, Sen. Elizabeth Warren is saying "no" to a 2016 run for the White House, but a growing grassroots Democrat movement is gathering steam and voicing an ever louder "yes."

In what could be bad news for Hillary Clinton, believed to have an unchallenged Democrat nomination all but sewn up, progressive Democrats across the country are showing evidence of "Clinton fatigue" and looking toward Warren as an alternative to another Clinton presidency, The Washington Post reports.

"Draft Warren" sites on Facebook and Change.org have picked up 250,000 supporters who favor a Warren challenge to Clinton, the Post notes, ramping up support from a series of 224 "house parties" in 46 states to urge Warren to go for it.

Warren spokeswoman Lacey Rose told The New York Times: "As Senator Warren has said many times, she is not running for president and doesn't support these draft campaigns."

Energized with $1.25 million from MoveOn.org, the Run Warren Run movement has opened campaign offices in Des Moines, Iowa, and Manchester, New Hampshire, and hired staff, such as seasoned political operator Blair Lawton, who said, "I'm excited to join hundreds of thousands of Americans who are energized by Sen. Warren's progressive economic vision."

The Run Warren Run website states: "Elizabeth Warren's message, an electrifying call to fix an economic system that is failing America's families, has already been recognized as one of the most compelling in the Democratic Party, in both red states and blue states."

Adam Beaves, an Iowa field director for Run Warren Run, a joint project of Moveon.org and Democracy for America, told a gathering of Warren supporters at a house party in Ames, Iowa, that "if we show her support on the ground, she will consider running for president.

"If you look back to when she was drafted to run for Senate in Massachusetts, her answers were really similar to what she's saying now. It's not in her personality to get ahead of things," the Post reported.

New York's Working Families Party (WFP) recently voted to support a Warren candidacy and Bill Lipton, state WFP director, told the Times: "We know a champion for working families when we see one. The only thing better than watching Elizabeth Warren take Wall Street to task from the Senate would be helping her bring our issues to the center of the national debate."

Ed Ott, former head of the New York City Central Labor Council, told the New York Times: "What the Warren vote reflects is that people want a Democratic Party with a spine."

Charles Chamberlain, Run Warren Run director, told the Boston Herald: "We want to change her mind. We believe that what Elizabeth Warren needs to see to make the decision to seize the reins and run for this is that she needs to know she's not going to go alone.

"This is her moment. This is her time."

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So far, Sen. Elizabeth Warren is saying "no" to a 2016 run for the White House, but a growing grassroots Democrat movement is gathering steam and voicing an ever louder "yes."
Elizabeth Warren, Hillary Clinton, Democrats
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2015-49-10
Tuesday, 10 Feb 2015 11:49 AM
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