Tags: Conway | Bharara | Noise

Conway: Reports on Bharara, US Attorneys 'Noise, Not News'

(Fox News/"Fox & Friends")

By    |   Monday, 13 Mar 2017 10:27 AM

President Donald Trump's decision to ask for the resignations of 46 U.S. attorneys appointed under the Obama administration is "noise, not news," as it's "very common for presidents to ask for the resignations of political appointees like ambassadors and like U.S. attorneys," presidential counsel Kellyanne Conway said Monday.

"This is not a news story," Conway told Fox News' "Fox & Friends" program. "It's noise not news. The past few presidents have done this. We made it uniform. The president made it uniform so that there were no carve outs. There were no special treatments."

One of those included Manhattan-based U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara, who was fired on Saturday because he refused to step down. According to reports, Trump tried to call Bharara, who oversaw several key corruption and white-collar cases, just a few days before he was asked to step down.

The move came as a surprise, as Bharara told reporters last fall Trump had asked him to remain in his position as chief federal prosecutor for the Southern District of New York.

Conway on Monday said only two of Obama's appointees were exempt from the order demanding the federal prosecutors step down, Dana Boente in Alexandria, Virginia and Rod Rosenstein in Maryland. Boente is the acting deputy attorney general.  Rosenstein is Trump's nominee for deputy attorney general, and if approved he will lead the probe into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential race, following Attorney General Jeff Session's decision to recuse himself.

Conway also commented on the program concerning new job numbers that are out, while noting that there is also a new level of consumer confidence.

"Also, when you repeal and replace something as draconian as Obamacare, you're going to unleash more economic prosperity, because people through these tax credits who don't get employer-sponsored or Medicaid-sponsored health insurance will have the opportunity, the choice, the competition to buy across state lines and get affordable care."

The American Health Care Act is the first piece of legislation coming under Trump's presidency, and Conway said it is appropriate that he has become involved in its negotiations, as he is "the ultimate dealmaker and also the ultimate decision maker."

On ABC's' "Good Morning America," Conway commented that healthcare reform is important because Americans no longer have a choice concerning their coverage.

"I think the people who receive health care through Medicaid, people who receive it through employers, which is many people in this country, they'll continue to have it as they're used to it now," said Conway. The plan, she continues, tries to equalize tax treatments for those who cannot pool together while buying coverage.

Story continues below video.

Conway, also appearing on NBC's "Today" show, sparred with anchors Matt Lauer and Savannah Guthrie after the latter asked her why Trump was accepting current jobs reports as true, when he decried them in the election.

"He's also talking about things that were fake," said Conway. "You can keep your doctor if you like your doctor. Keep your plan if you like your plan. There was fakery going on for people that was promised something that never came to be. And healthcare is a prime example of that."

"That doesn't answer the question," Guthrie told her. "You're mentioning healthcare. On this issue of the job numbers, fake then, real now?"

"I'm talking about numbers that matter to Americans right now," said Conway. "President [Barack] Obama has his legacy. President Trump is just getting started. But the stock market likes his presidency. Job creators like his presidency. The miners do.

"He rolled back a terrible regulation that was hurting them. And they're, along with manufacturing and construction, industries that are benefitting in an outsized way in his first initial jobs report from February, his first full month on the job."

© 2017 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

 
1Like our page
2Share
Politics
President Donald Trump's decision to ask for the resignations of 46 U.S. attorneys appointed under the Obama administration is "noise, not news," as it's "very common for presidents to ask for the resignations of political appointees like ambassadors and like U.S...
Conway, Bharara, Noise
632
2017-27-13
Monday, 13 Mar 2017 10:27 AM
Newsmax Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved