Tags: Trump Administration | GOP2016 | Law Enforcement | cleveland | rnc | security | safety

Delegates Expect Trouble, but Feel Safe With Security in Cleveland

Image: Delegates Expect Trouble, but Feel Safe With Security in Cleveland
(Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call via AP Images)

By    |   Monday, 18 Jul 2016 02:41 PM

As they arrived in Cleveland for the Republican National Convention July 18 to 21, delegates from throughout the U.S. told Newsmax they were concerned about security but also voiced confidence that law enforcement officers would keep them safe throughout the party conclave.

"I have great concern about security," Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson told us on Sunday, "But I see more safety measures than I have every anywhere before. There's law enforcement everywhere in Cleveland."

A former U.S. attorney, Hutchinson also called for "calm leadership that will recognize what is dividing the country. There should not be any room for intolerance and, first and foremost, unity behind those who protect us."

"There has been so much preparation by law enforcement officials for this convention. And I am proud that Texas law enforcement officials are participating in the security arrangements here," Rep. Roger Williams (R.-Texas) said.

Law enforcement officials told us that roughly 2,500 to 2,700 police officers from 15 states volunteered to come to Cleveland and help the city's police and the Cuyahoga County Sheriff's Department with security.

"And there are probably special plans for security that we don't even see now — and that's the way it should be," Williams added.

As to whether they expected violence this week, delegates' response were mixed.

"Do I expect it?" Mississippi Secretary of State Delbert Hosemann asked. "Not necessarily, but I wouldn't be surprised. Even if I knew there would be violence, I would still come to Cleveland. You can't let the terrorists stop the nation's progress."

"No, I hope there is no violence during the convention," Rep. Robert Hurt (R.-VA) told Newsmax. "It seems as though the police have a big job."

Another U.S. representative, Tom McClintock of California, said he felt safer because of Ohio's controversial "open carry law," which permits citizens to openly carry their firearms.

"We know the bad guys will get guns anyway, so it's nice to know the good guys have guns as well," McClintock told us.

The Californian then recalled his one-time boss and political mentor, the late State Sen. Ed Davis.

"When Ed was police chief of Los Angeles [1969-1978], he felt strongly that armed citizens were a major asset to the police," McClintock said. "He felt that citizens themselves enforced the law that the police were there to support them. I don't know what Cleveland is doing, but I see a lot of what Ed Davis spoke of.

"The issue of law and order has to be accentuated this fall. We cannot continue down the path we're on."

© 2017 Newsmax. All rights reserved.

 
1Like our page
2Share
Politics
As they arrived in Cleveland for the Republican National Convention July 18 to 21, delegates from throughout the U.S. told Newsmax they were concerned about security but also voiced confidence that law enforcement officers would keep them safe throughout the party...
cleveland, rnc, security, safety, police
423
2016-41-18
Monday, 18 Jul 2016 02:41 PM
Newsmax Inc.
 

Newsmax, Moneynews, Newsmax Health, and Independent. American. are registered trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc. Newsmax TV, and Newsmax World are trademarks of Newsmax Media, Inc.

NEWSMAX.COM
America's News Page
© Newsmax Media, Inc.
All Rights Reserved