Tags: Iran | ISIS/Islamic State | Middle East | War on Terrorism | Tom Cotton | letter | op-ed

Sen. Tom Cotton: 'Stop Iran From Obtaining a Nuclear Weapon'

By    |   Thursday, 19 Mar 2015 09:00 PM

In an opinion piece for the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, Sen. Tom Cotton defended his stance on wanting to keep nuclear weapons out of Iran, saying "a nuclear Iran presents too great of a threat to accept."

In the article, Cotton writes that he has no regrets about his decision to write an open letter, along with 46 other Republican senators, to Iran's leaders that threatened to erase any deal made with the country over its nuclear program.

"Our goal is simple: to stop Iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon. They needed to get this message loud and clear; they are not hearing it from the negotiators in Geneva," Cotton writes.

Cotton, who is from Arkansas, formed his argument by first discussing his time in the Army, during which he served as an officer in both Iraq and Afghanistan.

Cotton referred to the Iran-made roadside bombs, called improvised explosive devices (IEDs), that killed Americans on an almost daily basis on the roads in and around Baghdad.

"Iran is also responsible for the killing and maiming of thousands of American troops in Iraq and Afghanistan," Cotton writes. "During my tour in Baghdad, Iran supplied the most advanced, most lethal roadside bombs being used against coalition forces. My soldiers and I knew that Iranian-supplied bombs were the one thing our armored vehicles couldn't withstand. All we could do was hope it wasn't our day to hit one.

"My platoon was lucky; too many others were not."

According to reports, Iran also supplies both money and weapons to Hamas, Hezbollah, and other terror organizations that want to destroy Israel, one of the United States' most important allies.

"Despite Iran's outlaw behavior, President Obama forged ahead with negotiations anyway. And now what began as an unwise gamble has descended into dangerous, one-sided concessions," Cotton writes.

"As the March 24 negotiating deadline approaches, President Obama has suggested that he will accept a deal that allows Iran to enrich uranium and that has an expiration date. This result, according to former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, would be 'to move from preventing proliferation to managing it.'

"What's worse, President Obama plans to bypass Congress in these negotiations with Iran. The critical role of Congress in approving international agreements was clearly laid out by our founders in the Constitution to ensure that no president, whoever he or she may be, can commit America unilaterally to such binding agreements. And it's a principle upon which Democrats and Republicans had largely agreed until President Obama was elected."

Cotton admits the letter to Iran "has been the source of some controversy," but he vowed to stand his ground and "never back down from either political attacks or dictators abroad."

Cotton served two years in the House before winning a Senate seat last fall. The 37-year-old has been speaking his mind.

Last month, Cotton said he'd like to see terrorists "rot in Guantanamo Bay."

A few weeks later, Cotton suggested the U.S. should punish any of its allies that help resettle prisoners released from Guantanamo Bay, an American base on Cuba that houses a prison camp for terrorists.

Cotton's letter to Iran has arguably made the biggest impact.

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In an opinion piece for the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, Sen. Tom Cotton defended his stance on wanting to keep nuclear weapons out of Iran, saying "a nuclear Iran presents too great of a threat to accept."
Tom Cotton, letter, op-ed, stop Iran, nuclear, weapon, controversy, Army, Iraq, Afghanistan
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2015-00-19
Thursday, 19 Mar 2015 09:00 PM
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