Tags: Rolling Stones | Trump | Music | Rally

Rolling Stones to Trump: Stop Using Our Music

Image: Rolling Stones to Trump: Stop Using Our Music
Ronnie Wood, Mick Jagger, Keith Richards and Charlie Watts arrive for the private view of "The Rolling Stones: Exhibitionism" at the Saatchi Gallery on April 4, 2016 in London, England. (Photo by Chris Jackson/Getty Images)

By    |   Wednesday, 04 May 2016 02:55 PM

Donald Trump can't always get what he wants — as he learned on Wednesday when the Rolling Stones asked him to stop playing their music at his political rallies.

"The Rolling Stones have never given permission to the Trump campaign to use their songs and have requested that they cease all use immediately," a spokesperson for the legendary British band told Time magazine.

The warning was delivered just hours after Trump was declared the winner of the pivotal Indiana primary and his rival Ted Cruz dropped out of the race.

After making his victory speech at his Trump Tower building in New York City, loudspeakers blasted a cheeky message to his critics, with the Stones' classic 1969 hit, "You Can't Always Get What You Want."

It's at least the third time the billionaire tycoon and presumptive Republican presidential nominee has turned to the songs of Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Ron Wood and Charlie Watts.

At previous Trump rallies, the Trump campaign has used "Sympathy for the Devil" and "Brown Sugar."

Many defunct groups would likely welcome the free publicity for their music, but The Stones, who formed in 1962, remain very active. They still tour, recently having played a concert in Cuba, and are working on a new album of blues songs.

The Stones are just one of many acts who've objected to the use of their songs by politicians they don't agree with.

Tom Petty and John Hall fumed at the use of their music by George W. Bush, while Jackson Browne and John Cougar Mellencamp were peeved that Sen. John McCain played their songs at appearances.

Sarah Palin, McCain's running mate in 2008, was criticized for using the music of the band Heart. And Bruce Springsteen bristled at Ronald Reagan wanting to use his anthem "Born in the U.S.A."

The legalities of playing recorded music at political events are somewhat muddled.

According to Rolling Stone magazine, "Technically speaking, copyright laws allow political candidates to use just about any song they want, as long as they're played at a stadium, arena or other venue that already has a public-performance license through a songwriters' association such as ASCAP or BMI.

"However, the law contains plenty of gray area. If a candidate refuses to stop using a song in this scenario, an artist may be able to protect his 'right of publicity' — Springsteen's voice blaring over a loudspeaker is part of his image, and he has a right to protect his own image."

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Donald Trump can't always get what he wants - as he learned on Wednesday when the Rolling Stones asked him to stop playing their music at his political rallies.
Rolling Stones, Trump, Music, Rally
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2016-55-04
Wednesday, 04 May 2016 02:55 PM
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